Examples of Multidomestic, Transnational and Global Companies

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Examples of Multidomestic, Transnational and Global Companies

By | September 2008
Page 1 of 3
Multidomestic: McDonald’s
In 1955, McDonald's opened its first restaurant in Des Plaines, Illinois. Today, 2008, it operates over 31,000 restaurants worldwide, in 119 countries, on six continents, employing more than 1.5 million people all over the world. I consider McDonald’s a multidomestic company because they adjust to the cultures of their host countries. This is most seen in their branch in India. Cows are held sacred in the Indian religion of Hinduism which is why McDonald’s India doesn’t serve beef. Can you imagine? A McDonald’s restaurant without beef? Indian McDonald’s burgers are purely vegetarian and they serve several other products that are 100% beef free like several kinds of wraps and pans. We see this aspect of McDonald’s even here in the Philippines where they serve rice burgers.

Transnational: Nokia

Nokia is currently the number one manufacturer of mobile devices in the world. With a market share of about 38% in 2007 and with net sales of up to 51.1 billion Euros, there’s no doubt about the company’s significance and success. From Africa to the Asia Pacific to Europe, Latin America, Middle East and North America, Nokia provides us with cellular phones that are both stylish and functional. They are set to launch a global marketing campaign this year with the theme “1,001 reasons” for mankind. Though their marketing strategy is worldwide and their products basically uniform, I consider the company a transnational because of the conscious effort they put into understanding the different needs and tastes of their consumers all over the world. In line with this, Nokia has a team of design researchers, psychologists, sociologists and usability experts who “travel the globe exploring how people use their mobile devices, discovering how to make them better, how to reach the billions of people who don't own a phone - and learn a whole lot about people along the way”. One of their findings include the concept of “phone sharing” which is common...

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