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Examples of Figures of Speech in Romantics Poems

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Examples of Figures of Speech in Romantics Poems

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Examples of figures of speech in romantic poems

In the poem “Tintern Abbey” by William Wordsworth , “ the anchor of my purest thought” in line 109, the author uses a metaphor comparing the idea that nature makes the speaker feels safe and the role of memory and imagination as something pure.

In the poem “Ozymandias” by Pershy Bissy Shelley, The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed in line 8, it is an instance of Synecdoche and Alliteration. The hand that mock'd them makes reference to the sculptor who mocked the Pharaon´s passions by chiseling into the stone. Concerning the use of alliteration, the poet uses it as to create an emphasis.

In the poem “Darkness“ by Lord Byron, Byron personifies ships when he states "lay rotting on the sea" and "they slept on the abyss". Line 5 in the same poem, the author uses alliteration of the “b” sound to reinforce the idea of blackness

In “Ode on Melancholy“ by Keats, stanza 3 line 3, “aching pleasure” is an example of oxymoron, 2 contradicting ideas together such as ache and pleasure.

In “Ode to a Nightingale” by Keats, stanza 6 line 2, “easeful death” is an example of synesthesia that is when 2 senses opposing that would be the case of easeful as something easily and death, death is not something easy

In “Ode to a Grecian Urn” by Keats, the is an instance of paradox and oxymoron to open Stanza 2, Keats praises the silent music coming from the pipes as far more pleasing than the audible music of real life, since the music from the urn is for the spirit. Besides the speaker of the poem states that the unheard melodies are sweeter because they are not affected by time.

“Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard
Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on;”

Apostrophe is found in the opening lines of the ode when Keats addresses the urn as "Thou," "bride," "foster-child," and "historian"

In “the Rime of an ancient Mariner” by Samuel Colerigde, in Part 3 stanza 16 line 2, there...

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