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CONFIDENTIAL

LG/OCT2008/BEL311

UNIVERSITI TEKNOLOGI MARA FINAL EXAMINATION

COURSE COURSE CODE EXAMINATION TIME

ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES BEL311 OCTOBER 2008 3 HOURS

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES

1.
2.

This question paper consists of two (2) parts :

PART A (13 Questions) PART B (1 Question)

Answer ALL questions from all parts in the Question Paper. 3. Fill in the details below : UiTM STUDENT CARD NO. PROGRAMME/ CODE PART ENGLISH LANGUAGE GROUP NAME OF LECTURER 4. 5. You are allowed to bring in your English-English dictionary. Please check to make sure that this examination pack consists of: i) the Question Paper

DO NOT TURN THIS PAGE UNTIL YOU ARE TOLD TO DO SO
This examination paper consists of 13 printed pages
© Hak Cipta Universiti Teknologi MARA CONFIDENTIAL

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LG/OCT2008/BEL311

PART A: READING COMPREHENSION (20 MARKS) Read the following articles and answer all the questions that follow. Article 1 - Spare the Rod? I Schools in Europe and the United Kingdom stopped using the cane to discipline delinquent youngsters following protests from parents and politicians more than 16 years ago. In Malaysia, however, the practice has never left the school grounds. Caning has always been legal in Malaysian schools. The Education Ordinance 1957 (Amended 1959) allows corporal punishments, such as caning, to be meted out by school authorities, but only to schoolboys. An Education Ministry directive issued in 1994 listed eight offences that could warrant caning: truancy, involvement in criminal activities, obscene and impolite behaviour, loitering, dishonesty, dirty appearance and vandalism. 5

II

A probe on human rights awareness among secondary school teachers, students and administrators conducted by researchers from local universities engaged by the Human Rights Commission of Malaysia (or SUHAKAM, its Malay acronym) revealed the regular use of the cane in schools. What the inquiry found was a gross breach of a child's rights committed by teachers and administrators alike. In their findings, out of the 5,754 students who participated in the survey, about 52 per cent of the students surveyed agreed that caning commonly happened in their schools. It took place more often in rural schools than urban ones and almost 80 per cent of the cases occurred at technical schools.

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III

Understandably, SUHAKAM is disheartened by the findings of its study. Commissioner and education working group chairman, Professor Chiam Heng Keng said that while SUHAKAM understands the need to discipline and punish wrongdoers, it maintains that caning is not the best corrective measure. She further added that caning only tells the child to stop whatever he has done. In other words, it does not address the underlying problem. She stressed that teachers must work with parents to get to the root of the problem. She added that harsh punishments tend to reinforce a child's negative attitudes. However,

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© Hak Cipta Universiti Teknologi MARA

CONFIDENTIAL

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LG/OCT2008/BEL311

she cautioned that we should not confuse upholding the rights of the child with indulging the child.

IV

Although many experts argue that caning is outdated, even primitive, many educators defended it as a way to stem rising violence in schools. Eighty per cent of teachers agreed that persistent troublemakers in school should be caned. The SUHAKAM probe found that 79.5 per cent of teachers and 71.8 per cent of administrators agreed that persistent offenders should be caned though Malaysia had signed the Declaration of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) in 1995. In addition, they also revealed that girls were not spared the rod. Almost seven per cent of female respondents from girl schools had reported this. Under the present Child Act 2001, only boys between the ages of 10 and 18 may be subjected to corporal punishment.

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V

Last October, the...
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