Exam Paper

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Question
  • Pages : 54 (1727 words )
  • Download(s) : 243
  • Published : May 17, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Write your name here
Surname Other names

Edexcel Certificate Edexcel International GCSE

Centre Number

Candidate Number

English Language A
Paper 1
Thursday 10 January 2013 – Morning Time: 2 hours 15 minutes You must have: Insert (enclosed)
Paper Reference

KEA0/01 4EA0/01
Total Marks

Instructions
Use black ink or ball-point pen. Fill in the boxes at the top of this page with your name, centre number and candidate number. Answer all questions. Answer the questions in the spaces provided – there may be more space than you need.

Information
The total mark for this paper is 60. The marks for each question are shown in brackets – use this as a guide as to how much time to spend on each question. The quality of written communication will be assessed in your responses to Sections B and C – you should take particular care on these questions with your spelling, punctuation and grammar, as well as the clarity of expression. Copies of the Edexcel Anthology for IGCSE and Certificate Qualifications in English Language and Literature may not be brought into the examination. Dictionaries may not be used in this examination.

Advice
Read each question carefully before you start to answer it. Keep an eye on the time. Try to answer every question. Check your answers if you have time at the end. Turn over

P41521A
©2013 Pearson Education Ltd.

*P41521A0120*

1/1/1/1/1

Section A: Reading You should spend about 45 minutes on this section. Read the following passage carefully and then answer the questions which follow. In this passage, the writer describes how he returns to Soche Hill School in Africa where he was a volunteer teacher. A Disappointing Return! I had been imagining this return trip down the narrow track to Soche Hill for many years. Some trips mean so much to us that we rehearse them obsessively in our head, in delicious anticipation. It was a homecoming more important to me than going back to Medford where I had grown up. Instead of driving straight to the school I stopped at the nearby town of Limbe, which began abruptly, the edge of the town slummy, with the outdoor businesses – bicycle menders, car repairers, coffin-makers; the rest of it chaotic, litter and mobs, small businesses and bars and dubious-looking clinics. The town was much fuller – larger and meaner-looking. In a fine, chilly and drifting mist, I drove out of Limbe by a familiar route; uphill through a forest that had once been much larger, past a village that had once been much smaller, on a paved road that had once been just a muddy track. My hopes were raised by this narrow but good back road that ascended to the lower slopes of Soche Hill, for I assumed that this improved road indicated that the school too had been improved. But I was wrong. The school was almost unrecognisable. What had been a set of school buildings in a large grove of trees was a semi-derelict compound of battered buildings in a muddy, open field. The trees had been cut down, the grass was chest high. At first glance the place was so poorly maintained as to seem abandoned: broken windows, doors ajar, mildewed walls, gashes in the roofs, and just a few people standing around, emptyhanded, doing nothing but gaping at me. I walked to the house I had once lived in. The now-battered building had once lain behind hedges and blossoming shrubs, but the shrubbery was gone, replaced by a small scrappy garden of withered maize. Tall elephant grass had almost overwhelmed the garden and now pressed against the house. The building was scorched and patched. Firewood had been thrown in a higgledy-piggledy stack outside the kitchen. More rain-stained mildewed walls and sagging roofs, more broken windows and cracked verandas up the road, at the other teachers’ houses. The drizzle was coming down hard now, but the rain and the mud and the dripping trees and the green slime on the brick walls were appropriate to the melancholy I felt. I met two teachers standing in the...
tracking img