Evs Project on Symbiosis

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  • Topic: Symbiosis, Parasitism, Mutualism
  • Pages : 6 (1465 words )
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  • Published : May 16, 2013
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Symbiosis

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROJECT

2013
SHIVAM AGRWAL
XII – COM –B
ROLL NO: 32

Index
S.N| Topic| Page No.| Signature|
1)| Symbiosis -Introduction| 3-4| |
2)| Objective| 4| |
3)| Types of symbiosis| 5-9| |
4)| Picture Gallery| 10| |
5)| Conclusion and bibliography| 11-12| |

Introduction

Symbiosis is close and often long-term interaction between two or more different biological species. In 1877, Bennett used the word symbiosis (which previously had been used to depict people living together in community) to describe the mutualistic relationship in lichens. In 1879, the German mycologist Heinrich Anton de Bary defined it as "the living together of unlike organisms." The definition of symbiosis is controversial among scientists. Some believe symbiosis should only refer to persistent mutualisms, while others believe it should apply to any types of persistent biological interactions (i.e. mutualistic, commensalistic, orparasitic). Some symbiotic relationships are obligate, meaning that both symbionts entirely depend on each other for survival. For example, many lichens consist of fungal and photosynthetic symbionts that cannot live on their own. Others are facultative, meaning that they can, but do not have to live with the other organism. Symbiotic relationships include those associations in which one organism lives on another (ectosymbiosis, such as mistletoe), or where one partner lives inside the other (endosymbiosis, such as lactobacilli and other bacteria in humans or Symbiodinium incorals). Symbiosis is also classified by physical attachment of the organisms; symbiosis in which the organisms have bodily union is called conjunctive symbiosis, and symbiosis in which they are not in union is called disjunctive symbiosis. .

OBJECTIVE

Study on Symbiosis

Symbiosis can mainly be of 3 types :-

i. Mutualism
ii. Commensalism
iii. Parasitism

MUTUALISM
Mutualism is any relationship between individuals of different species where both individuals benefit. In general, only lifelong interactions involving close physical and biochemical contact can properly be considered symbiotic. Mutualistic relationships may be either obligate for both species, obligate for one but facultative for the other, or facultative for both. Many biologists restrict the definition of symbiosis to close mutualist relationships. A large percentage of herbivores have mutualistic gut fauna that help them digest plant matter, which is more difficult to digest than animal prey. This gut fauna is made up of cellulose-digesting protozoans or bacteria living in the herbivores' intestines. Coral reefs are the result of mutualisms between coral organisms and various types of algae that live inside them. Most land plants and land ecosystems rely on mutualisms between the plants, which fix carbon from the air, and mycorrhyzal fungi, which help in extracting water and minerals from the ground. An example of mutual symbiosis is the relationship between the ocellaris clownfish that dwell among the tentacles of Ritteri sea anemones. The territorial fish protects the anemone from anemone-eating fish, and in turn the stinging tentacles of the anemone protect the clownfish from its predators. Special mucus on the clownfish protects it from the stinging tentacles. A further example is the goby fish, which sometimes lives together with a shrimp. The shrimp digs and cleans up a burrow in the sand in which both the shrimp and the goby fish live. The shrimp is almost blind, leaving it vulnerable to predators when above ground. In case of danger the goby fish touches the shrimp with its tail to warn it. When that happens both the shrimp and goby fish quickly retreat into the burrow. One of the most spectacular examples of obligate mutualism is between the siboglinid tube worms and symbiotic bacteria that live athydrothermal vents and cold seeps. The worm has no digestive tract and is wholly...
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