Evolution of Vampires, Film-Making, and the Horror Genre

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Nosferatu (1922)
1. Only production of Prana Film
2. German Expressionist film
a. Inspired from Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel Dracula
b. Producers were sued for unauthorized use of the novel. i. The court ordered all existing prints of Nosferatu burned, but one copy of the film had already been distributed around the world. The prints were then duplicated over the years. 3. Directed by: F.W. Murnau

c. Murnau was voted the 33rd Greatest Director of all time by Entertainment Weekly. 4. Stars
d. Max Schreck
ii. German actor, acted mostly in horror genre, and also played out-of-the-norm characters. iii. His performance in Nosferatu has remained one of the most terrifying characters in film history. e. Gustav von Wangenheim

f. Greta Schröder
5. Reception
g. Positive reviews
h. Ranked twenty-first in Empire magazine's "The 100 Best Films of World Cinema" in 2010. The Lost Boys (1987)
1. American horror film
a. The title is a reference to the stories about Peter Pan and Neverland. 2. Followed by two sequels.
3. Directed by: Joel Schumacher
b. The Lost Boys was considered one of his biggest hits. 4. Stars
c. Jason Patric
d. Kiefer Sutherland
e. Corey Haim
f. Jami Gertz
g. Corey Feldman
h. Dianne Wiest
i. Edward Herrmann
j. Barnard Hughes
5. Reception
k. Grossed over $32 million
l. Won a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film in 1987
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (2012)
1. American action fantasy horror film
2. Based on the 2010 novel of the same name
3. $69 million budget
a. Screenplay written and adapted by the author of the novel, Seth Grahame-Smith 4. Directed by: Timur Bekmambetov
b. Also co-produced with Tim Burton
5. Stars
c. Benjamin Walker Benjamin Walker
i. Title role in this film is the role he is best known for. d. Dominic Cooper
e. Anthony Mackie
f. Mary Elizabeth Winstead
g. Rufus Sewell
h. Marton Csokas
i. Jimmi Simpson
6. Reception
j. Received generally unfavorable reviews.
k. Grossed $16,306,974 in its opening weekend.
l. Grossed a total of $116,471,580
1. The Horror Genre
a. Horror is the genre of monsters, ghosts, vampires, werewolves, zombies, and more. These films demand an emotional response from its viewers, and that is fear. They achieve this reaction through psychology, and also gory explicit details (Saricks, J. (2011) At leisure: Reconsidering the horror genre). Horror films often deal with the viewer's nightmares, hidden fears, and terror of the unknown (Steve Bennett. "Definition Horror Fiction Genre"). This genre serves to attract and repel the viewers simultaneously, and to entertain the audience by creating feelings of panic, alarm, fright, and dread. Watching horror films creates an opening to that scary world we create with our vivid imaginations. Horror films date back to the onset of films themselves. However, in these times filmmakers could not rely on terrifying special effects to evoke fear from their audience. In order to get this response, many filmmakers used psychology to tap into the viewers dream states, and the horror of the irrational and unknown. The earliest horror films were usually done in Gothic style, meaning they were commonly set in spooky old mansions and castles, and it’s main characters often included "unknown," human, supernatural or grotesque creatures (filmsite.org “Horror Films” article: part 1). With the advancement of technology, horror films shifted from Gothic style to more contemporary, giving way for sub-genres to emerge such as the horror-of-Armageddon film and the horror-of-the-demonic film. The 1980s brought a wave of gory horror films that became cult classics, despite the negative reviews from critics. (Charles Derry, Dark Dreams: A...
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