Evolution of Cognitive Psychology

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Evolution of Cognitive Psychology
Latrice T. Colbert
Julie Bruno, Psy.D
September 6, 2010

Cognition is a term referring to the mental processes involved in gaining knowledge and comprehension, including thinking, knowing, remembering, judging and problem-solving. Not only is cognitive psychology central to everything a person does in his or her everyday life, it is also central to psychology’s quest to understand how people think and act. Cognitive psychology is a key player within the interdisciplinary field of study termed “cognitive science.” Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary effort to understand the mind. Cognitive science includes a number of disciplines, five of them plus cognitive psychology lying at its core.

Philosophy, the first disciple to systematically examine the mind, helps to formulate and examine the fundamental questions that define the field. Neuroscience attempts to specify the relationship between mind and brain. Artificial intelligence addresses issues if mind by modeling human thought processes with computer hardware and software. The field of linguistics investigates the structure of language and the specifics of language use and what it says about the mind. Anthropology explores the mind through quite a different lens, the lens of culture.

According to Stout (2008) George Mandler, a longtime researcher in the area of memory and cognition, has gathered together his notes and selected bits from previous publications to assemble a new book cast as a brief history of the emergence of cognitive psychology. The challenges to introspective method from the perspective of imageless thought gained an all of sorts amongst behaviorist. Because behaviorism focused on the external nature, and therefore the ‘not-conscious’ nature, of connections amongst elements, they demonstrated that an individual could have structure without consciousness.

Although behaviorism...
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