Evolution Lab Report

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 567
  • Published : September 10, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
repeated for island size, starting population, heritability, and variance. The goal in thisprocess of testing was to see what parameters would need to be in place to allow the

ParameterDarwinIslandWallaceIsland
Initial BeakSize30 mm30 mmHeritability0.50.5Variance11Clutch Size16 eggs16 eggsPrecipitation10 cm10 cmPopulation290 birds290 birds ResultsDarwinIslandWallaceIsland
yr. 209619801975yr. 219619921803yr. 229618891933

Evolution Lab Report
Bradley Cuthbertson
BIO/101
July 30, 2012
Tracy Nearing

Evolution Lab Report

Evolution Lab Report
The Evolution Lab allows the user to experiment with the finches’ adaptation and evolution of their population over 100, 200, and 300 years. The locations of the experiment is on Darwin Island and Wallace Island. Using various parameters that influence adaptations and natural selection, the user can study the evolution process. Hypothesis.

• Beak size and precipitation will have an immense effect on the population. • The size of the island will affect the population.
• The larger the clutch the higher the population over time. Materials and Methods.
The Materials that were used was a Laptop with internet conection, the browser used was Google Chrome, The Evolution Lab website from the University of Phoenix, which provides many variables, furthermore the user can change the following: beak size, variance of beak size in the population, heritability of the mid parent beak size, clutch size, island size, population of the finches to start the experiment, and precipitation on the island as it affects the harness of seeds. All of the numerous combinations of variables, set for two different islands lends for hours of combinations and sorting of information. The method this experimenter used to narrow down the countless options was to first focus on the beak size and precipitation for Darwin Island by changing the variables, recording the field notes for the population in 100 years. Second, keep the highest...
tracking img