Evluate the Significance of the Main Triggers for Change Which Exist Today, in Terms of the Amount of Pressure They Put on Organisations

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 145
  • Published : February 8, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
In organizational development, triggers, or triggering events, can be explained as circumstances which act as a catalyst to organizational learning. Just like all living beings, organizations do not learn proactively (Watkins and Marsick, 1993). In these modern times, this urgency is multiplied tenfold given the tremendous pressures to perform and produce results. Modern organizations are subject to both external (macro) and internal (micro) forces which are normally the main triggers to change. Examples of macro forces would be things like new technologies, higher customer expectations, higher employee expectations and a more competitive market. Micro forces would mainly be to do with internal organizational challenges such as declining/increasing profits and increasing/declining cost, limited financial resources and employee performance management. Technology has been for a significant part of the 20th and 21st Century, one of the main triggers to change in almost every type of industry. In the early 1900s, the Automobile was effectively made available to the masses by Henry Ford when he introduced the assembly line. Soon it made sense for other manufacturing businesses to use this tool to further grow their industries and thus manufacturing as we see it today is the result of Henry Ford’s innovation. A more recent example would be IBMs introduction of the personal computer. Its success led it to becoming the de facto standard with other companies developing the IBM compatible PC, which in turn led to branding like diskettes being advertised as "IBM format". An IBM PC clone could be built with off-the-shelf parts, but the BIOS required some reverse-engineering. Companies like Phoenix Software Associates, American Megatrends, Award, and others achieved workable versions of the BIOS, allowing companies like DELL, Compaq, and HP to manufacture PCs that worked like IBM's product. The IBM PC became the industry standard. This led to an even more profound...
tracking img