Everything Bad Is Good for You Review

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  • Topic: Deferred gratification, Gratification, Popular culture
  • Pages : 4 (1218 words )
  • Download(s) : 192
  • Published : May 20, 2013
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Xbox and MTV Improving My Life Hours on End

The world of pop culture will never be the same. Visionary writer Steven Johnson proves this to be true in his work Everything Bad is Good for You. Possibly the best thing about this book is how upfront Johnson is with his message. His aims at convincing his audience of a simple yet novel idea: popular culture has become more complex and mentally stimulating over the past thirty years. One of Johnson’s greatest strengths in his writing is how often he circulates to that point, making it certain his point shines throughout the book. Johnson is treading thin ice with his statements about the “dumbed down” television and video games. The common immediate thought with American pop culture resembles an overweight adolescent staring at a television drooling with one hand on the remote and the other in his nose. Johnson intends to completely erase that misconception. As he puts it, “the popular media steadily, but almost imperceptibly, making our minds sharper, as we soak in entertainment usually dismissed as so much lowbrow fluff.” (Johnson xiii) The intelligence of Johnson is polished through his evidence to said fact.

Grand Theft Auto, Halo, SIMS. What kinds of thoughts do said prevalent video games bring to mind? The general consensus about video games for over a decade is a negative one. An agreement that video games have a whole heartedly negative effect on a child’s maturing, intelligence, and overall well-being. Resident boundary pusher Steven Johnson has an utterly contradictory belief on idea. Utilizing reading books as the universal method for child development Johnson shows how it doesn’t accomplish as much as was previously thought, and how video games can fill that void.

Proving his unbiased book, Johnson foreshadows his upcoming points by stating “I believe the printed word remains the most powerful vehicle for conveying complicated information.” (Johnson 23) Moving...
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