Everyman Script - Our Interpretation

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Jester [Clowns-Introduction.]
I pray you all give audience,
For our play is a moral play.
The summoning of everyman
And doth of our lives and ending show.
Look well, take heed
To thy ending,
For sin, though in the beginning so sweet,
Yet doth cause in the end for the soul to weep,
When the body lieth in clay.
How will fade from thee as flowers in may,
Thy strength and thy beauty, thy pleasure and folly,
When thou art called to a reckoning,
Like everyman, to out heavenly King.
Give audience and hear our play.
God's messenger comes,
List to what he doth say.

I, Gabriel am, God's messenger am I.
Here on earth for yet this little time,
I see how all His creatures
Be to their God unkind.
Drowned in sin, in worldly riches is all their mind,
They fear no more His anger, the sharp rod
Man, on this earth, forgetteh his God.
So therefore now, with all the speed he can,
God will a reckoning take of everyman!

Here am I, Death. Come at your will.
Here am I, Death. Come at your will.
God's every commandment to fulfil.
I will claim everyman that liveth ill,
That dreadeth not folly, nor fears God's will,
And he that loves riches I will strike with my dart.
In hell shall he dwell, world without end.

I see everyman walking,
Little he think of my coming.
Everyman stand still!
In great haste I am sent to thee,
From God out of his Majesty.
A reckoning from thee He must have,
Thy many bad deeds, and good but a few
I am death that all men dreadeth
Thy God, thy life and deeds to show
Thee with me on a journey must go
I care not for gold, nor silver, nor riches,
Nor pope, nor emperor, king nor princes.
Thee must get thee gone on thy journey today.

Oh Death, thou comest when I had thee least in mind.
A thousand pounds and more thou shall have,
If thou comest to me on another day.

This is the day,
That no man living may escape away.

To whom were it best my sorrow to show?

What if to Fellowship I should speak?
We have in the world for many a day
Been most good friends in sport and play.
I trust he will bear me company,
Well met, good Fellowship, and good morrow!

Everyman, good morrow to thee this day!
Why lookst thou so piteously?
If anything be amiss, tell me, I pray,
That I may help find remedy.
My true friend
I will not forsake thee.

That was well spoken and lovingly.

If any have wronged you, ye shall revenged be,
Though I on the ground be slain for thee.

Commanded I am to go a long way,
A journey hard and dangerous,
And give account without delay,
Before almighty God, my Lord.
Wherefore I pray you bear me company,
As you have promised on this journey.

This is another matter,
Promise is duty, true.

And, Fellowship thou didst promise!

But if such a journey I should go,
I know it well, it would be to my woe.
And when, my friend, should we come again?

Till the Day of Doom, never again.

In faith then, I will not come there!
For no man that is living today.
Will I go on that fearful way!

Oh, Fellowship, you swore by God's head,
You would never forsake me, quick or dead.

I know what I said!
But if thou wouldest eat and drink
And make good cheer,
I would not forsake thee while the day is clear.

But will not bear me company today.
I have loved thee long, then remember me,
Aid me in my necessity!

Whether thee hast loved me or no,
I tell thee this, I will not with thee go!

Farewell, good Fellowship, for thee my heart is sore.
Adieu forever, I shall see thee no more.

To Kindred will I go indeed.
Praying her to help me in my need.
I believe she will do so,
For kind will stay where friendship dare not go.

How be ye now my friend?

Why, here I be at your command!
I pray you show me...
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