Everyman Close Reading

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EVERYMAN. O Jesu, help! All hath forsaken me.
GOOD DEEDS. Nay, Everyman; I will bide with thee.
I will not forsake thee indeed;
Thou shalt find me a good friend at need.
EVERYMAN. Gramercy, Good Deeds! Now may I true friends see.[855] They have forsaken me, every one;
I loved them better than my Good Deeds alone.
Knowledge, will ye forsake me also?
KNOWLEDGE. Yea, Everyman, when ye to Death shall go;
But not yet, for no manner of danger.[860]
EVERYMAN. Gramercy Knowledge, with all my heart.
KNOWLEDGE. Nay, yet I will not from hence depart
Till I see where ye shall become.
EVERYMAN. Methink, alas, that I must be gone
To make my reckoning and my debts pay,[865]
For I see my time is nigh spent away.
Take example, all ye that this do hear or see,
How they that I loved best to forsake me,
Except my Good Deeds that bideth truly.
GOOD DEEDS. All earthly things is but vanity:[870]
Beauty, Strength, and Discretion do man forsake,
Foolish friends, and kinsmen, that fair spake—
All fleeth save Good Deeds, and that am I. (851 – 873)

In Everyman, lines 851 – 873, the reader gets a clearer idea of what the theme of the play is. It brings into focus what the play revolves around most, and puts the rest of the play together. In this section of the play right before Everyman climbs into his grave with Good Deeds, Everyman talks about how everyone he thought were friends to him abandoned him, and he recognizes Good Deeds for being the one person, despite his past of paying him no mind, to accompany him on his journey and to be with him until he reaches his grave, and the very end of his life. Good Deeds tells of how and why he is the only one to accompany him to meet his maker. This section justifies the reason behind why Good Deeds is the one to accompany Everyman to the grave, as well as past events in the play.

The main point of this section is to reveal to the reader why...
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