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Eveline by James Joyce

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Eveline by James Joyce

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  • November 2012
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Essay 2

Leaving the only “home” that one has ever known can be very emotional, especially when you hold so many memories and have established a routine of life in that home. Many say “live life to the fullest,” yet they come up with excuse after excuse that holds them from leaving. They feel as if they can’t make this decision on their own. Trying to find the meaning of life and making attempts to discover the reason why they were put on this Earth is hard enough. Every day one lives new experiences that we hope will one day lead us to our destined future. Yet, for so many, not knowing where to begin keeps them from moving forward. Reminiscing on the memories created in our home; thinking about how much those memories have faded, and will eventually disappears if they are to leave that home. Being attached to the environment that one is used to or the routine of life holds one back from what the future could hold. Even when given the key to escape, thinking too hard makes one doubt their ability to adapt to a new environment. “What if’s?” and breaking that routine of life gives one fear of failure, not “making it” once leaving the environment. Feeling stuck in trying to find meaning of life makes it easier to come up with excuses to stay in the routine in which one is accustomed to.

This is true because it is what happened to Eve line in “Eve line” by James Joyce from Ireland during the early 20th century. No matter how many times Eve line sits and thinks about moving forward, and living new experiences, she was stuck in her past and thinking about it so much does not let her move on and travel to break out of her routine and bad habits.

Joyce does an excellent job illustrating Eveline’s decision making process with language and symbols throughout the short story. He begins by telling us where Eve line is sitting in her home “at the window watching the evening invade the avenue” as she smells the “odor of dusty cretonne” letting readers know that it was a...