Euthanasia

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Bryce Burciaga
1/18/13
English 1B
Euthanasia

Throughout society, the topic of euthanasia has been commonly discussed and debated between religious, political, and social groups. Euthanasia is defined as “ the painless killing of a patient suffering from an incurable and painful disease or in an irreversible coma.” To this day society is still unable to come upon a conclusion on the legality of euthanasia as it is thought as borderline murder. However, assisted suicide is legal in only three states in America; Oregon, Montana, and Washington. Different aspects play an important role in this decision-making process including religion, natural rights, and money. However, the idea of assisting someone with his or her will to die because of excruciating and incurable pain is common sense. Although euthanasia is thought as to be murder, we all contain the natural right to die. Looking through the lens of morality, euthanasia should be legalized as we all have the right to choose our own fate. The different types of euthanasia are to be considered as they play an important role on the debate. Euthanasia falls into two main categories; Voluntary and Involuntary. Voluntary euthanasia is the act of requesting death by the person who is near death itself. Involuntary euthanasia is more debated, as it occurs when the patient is unable to make the decision between life and death, for instance if he or she is in a coma, an appropriate person will make the decision for them. There are as well two different ways to go about pursuing the act of euthanasia; active and passive euthanasia. In active euthanasia, a person directly and quickly ends someone’s life. In passive euthanasia, ending someone’s life is indirect and more of a prolonged process; say if they terminate the medicine or nutrients that the patient requires. Both involuntary and voluntary can be decided easily by ones morals. We are born with the innate desire to take action in ending...
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