Eustress: Stress Management

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Abstract
When deciding on a career many people consider the type of work, the hours involved, and the salary; what they fail to consider is the stress factor. A fact that is not taught in school is that different types of careers involve different levels and types of stress. However, not all stress is bad, some stress is actually good, and the human body requires a certain amount of stress to get motivated. The bad stress is called distress when it reaches dangerous levels. The good stress is called eustress; the difficult part is finding the perfect amount of stress in order for your body to utilize the eustress productively. This is not an easy task for employees in managerial positions. Managers are usually taxed from above and below. They are sandwiched in between demands for better production, higher rates of efficiency, and greater profits from their superiors and requests for higher wages, better working conditions, and more direction from their subordinates. In order to develop a healthy relationship with stress, managers must first recognize the presence and type of stress. The next step is to determine the type of method that would control distress effectively to turn into the more productive eustress. The understanding of stress and the development and implementation of stress management techniques to turn distress to eustress is a critical component in becoming an effective, successful manager. Eustress, Me Stress, We all have Stress

Everyone has stress in his or her life, from birth until our last breath, its innate. The type of stress and how we cope with it is going to vary throughout our lives. The young child is not going to have the same stress as a teenager, and a teenager is not going to have the same stress as a middle manager. The way individuals assess and cope with stress varies greatly. Unrecognized stress can have devastating effects on an individual’s physical and emotional wellbeing. Coping methods can deter the negative affects of stress both physically and emotionally. Defining stress is an important first step. Without a clear understanding of stress and how it is caused it is difficult to understand the different types of stress. Once a comprehension of the two types of stress is achieved the manager must then gain an understanding of the physical and psychological effects. An additional clarification that the manager must assess is their job and how it affects their levels of stress. After obtaining a thorough assessment the manager able to effectively determine which type of stress management would work best for their individual situation. The understanding of stress and the development and implementation of stress management techniques to turn distress to eustress is a critical component in becoming an effective, successful manager. Purpose of Study

The purpose of this study is to assess the presence of stress in the working environment of a middle manager. This will include but may not be limited to; a definition of stress, an assessment of the stress a manager faces, and applicable stress management techniques. Limitations of Study

This study was limited by the restraints imposed in a nine-week course, inexperience of the student author; as well as, financial and geographical limitations to research sources. This study will be limited to the organizational stress of an employee in middle management. Definitions of Terms

• Autonomic nervous system – the part of the nervous system in vertebrates that regulates involuntary action. •
Review of Literature
What is stress?
“Everyone knows what stress is but nobody really knows” this definitive quote is from Hans Selye, the renowned father of stress research (American institute of stress [AIS], n.d.). Selye, along with many of his predecessors have found it difficult to agree on a single definition of stress. Seyles loosely defined stress in 1936 as “the non-specific response of the body to any demand for change” (AIS,...
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