Ethnologic Analysis of Culture

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Amish Culture

Ronald F. Williams

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, ANT 101

Instructor Michelle McBrady

December 10, 2012

Amish Culture

The Amish are known as Anabaptists meaning rebaptizers, the Anabaptist also rejected infant baptism because they felt baptism should signify an voluntary adult decision to follow Jesus. During the sixteenth-century they lived a life of turmoil as a result of their beliefs. The Amish’s primary mode of subsistence is emerging agriculturalists, a method of cultivating soil, producing crops, raising and hording livestock. Traditional Amish culture revolve around agriculture, farm life is practiced and handed down through ancestry. The farming life style is extremely important to the Amish because not only is it their primary source of subsistence but by working together in the field, the Amish work as a unit, fostering family and self-reliance, creating a bond among neighbors during harvest time or at a barn-raising. In Amish life barn work is as serious as their beliefs towards religion. Barn work is only interrupted for weddings, funerals and other important religious events. During this essay I plan to explain the Amish culture going in to detail about their gender relations, kinship, belief and values to relate them all back to the Amish primary mode of subsistence.

1) Beliefs and values

A) Church and government should be separate
B) Baptism is a adult choice to follow God, no infant baptism C) Farming to be more like Jesus Christ
D) Church practices separate from rest of the world
E) Amish endorse basic Christian beliefs; however, their spirituality has been shaped by their interpretation of the Bible as well as several written sources

2) Kinship

A) All members assist with farming...
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