Ethiopia

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Ethiopia

As the anthropologists say, all people come from Ethiopians. “Lucy’s” skeleton discovered in 1974 is considered the oldest human “trace”. It is believed that she lived more than 3 million years ago. At 435,071 square miles (1,126,829 km2), Ethiopia is the world's 27th-largest country. The major portion of Ethiopia lies on the Horn of Africa, which is the eastern most part of the African landmass. Bordering Ethiopia are Sudan and South Sudan to the west, Djibouti and Eritrea to the north, Somalia to the east, and Kenya to the south. The most important rivers are: The Blue Nile, Awash, Webbe Shibeli and Genale. The most important lake is Lake Tana who is the source of the Blue Nile. Food in Daily Life. Injera , a spongy unleavened bread made from teff grain, is the staple of every meal. All food is eaten with the hands, and pieces of injera are ripped into bite-sized pieces and used to dip and grab stews ( wat ) made of vegetables such as carrots and cabbage, spinach, potatoes, and lentils. The most common spice is berberey, which has a red pepper base. Tourism: There are a lot of attractions in Ethiopia. You could: -Visit the capital: Addis Ababa

-Visit the Nile Waterfalls and Langano lake
- Lalibela has churches carved in stone
-Visit the safari where you can find: lions, giraffes, wolfs, elephants zebras. Food Customs at Ceremonial Occasions. The coffee ceremony is a common ritual. The server starts a fire and roasts green coffee beans while burning frankincense. Once roasted, the coffee beans are ground with a mortar and pestle, and the powder is placed in a traditional black pot called a jebena . Water is then added. The jebena is removed from the fire, and coffee is served after brewing for the proper length of time. Often, kolo (cooked whole-grain barley) is served with the coffee. Clothing

Ethiopians are justifiably proud of the range of their traditional costumes. The most obvious identification of the different groups is in the jewellery, the hair styles and  the embroidery of the dresses. The women of Amhara and Tigray wear dozens of  plaits (sheruba), tightly braided to the head and billowing out at the shoulders. The women of Harar part their hair in the middle and make a bun  behind each ear. Hamer, Geleb, Bume and Karo men form a ridge of plaited hair and clay to hold their feathered headwear in place. Arsi women have fringes and short, bobbed hair. Bale girls have the same, but cover it with a black  headcloth, while young children often have their heads shaved. Jewellery in silver  and gold is worn by both Muslims and Christians, often with amber or glass beads  incorporated. Heavy brass, copper and ivory bracelets and anklets are also  worn. Ethiopia also has a  rich tradition of both secular and religious music, singing and dancing, and  these together constitute an important part of Ethiopian cultural life. Singing accompanies many agricultural activities, as well as religious festivals and  ceremonies surrounding life's milestones - birth, marriage and death. Traditional houses are round dwellings with cylindrical walls made of wattle and daub. The roofs are conical and made of thatch, and the center pole has sacred significance in most ethnic groups, including the Oromo, Gurage, Amhara, and Tigreans. Variations on this design occur. In the town of Lalibella the walls of many houses are made of stone and are two-storied, while in parts of Tigre, houses are traditionally rectangular. In more urban areas, a mixture of tradition and modernity is reflected in the architecture. The thatched roofs often are replaced with tin or steel roofing. The wealthier suburbs of Addis Ababa have multistory residences made of concrete and tile that are very western in form. Addis Ababa, which became the capital in 1887, has a variety of architectural styles. The city was not planned, resulting in a mixture of housing styles. Communities of wattle-and-daub tin-roofed houses often lie next to...
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