Ethics and Moral Values in Professional Context

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 785
  • Published : February 27, 2009
Open Document
Text Preview



Ethics, also called MORAL PHILOSOPHY, the discipline concerned with what is morally good and bad, right and wrong. The term is also applied to any system or theory of moral values or principles.

How should we live? Shall we aim at happiness or at knowledge, virtue, or the creation of beautiful objects? If we choose happiness, will it be our own or the happiness of all? And what of the more particular questions that face us: Is it right to be dishonest in a good cause? Can we justify living in opulence while elsewhere in the world people are starving? If conscripted to fight in a war we do not support, should we disobey the law? What are our obligations to the other creatures with whom we share this planet and to the generations of humans who will come after us?

Ethics deals with such questions at all levels. Its subject consists of the fundamental issues of practical decision making, and its major concerns include the nature of ultimate value and the standards by which human actions can be judged right or wrong.

The terms ethics and morality are closely related. We now often refer to ethical judgments or ethical principles where it once would have been more common to speak of moral judgments or moral principles. These applications are an extension of the meaning of ethics. Strictly speaking, however, the term refers not to morality itself but to the field of study, or branch of inquiry, that has morality as its subject matter. In this sense, ethics is equivalent to moral philosophy.

Although ethics has always been viewed as a branch of philosophy, its all-embracing practical nature links it with many other areas of study, including anthropology, biology, economics, history, politics, sociology, and theology. Yet, ethics remains distinct from such disciplines because it is not a matter of factual knowledge in the way that the sciences and other branches of inquiry are. Rather, it has to do with determining the nature of normative theories and applying these sets of principles to practical moral problems. A profession has been defined as a paid occupation, especially one that involves prolonged training and a formal qualification . In this modern electronic era there is a long queue of candidates aspiring to become one professional or the other it may be technical or non technical and are considered to be on a higher edge over the traditional means of livelihood. There is a great competition and to get into the queue one may have to adopt the tactics considered to be non-ethical. Once an individual gets into non-ethical tactics it becomes a part of his life style and is reflected in their routine behavior while performing or practicing their professions. An individual who had paid a handsome amount while taking admission into professional course is more likely to recover his expenditure later in his life as a professional .While imparting training the laxity left behind in their expertise is always existing in their pupils and fellow members. Suppose an individual in profession of journalism has to adopt certain basic principles without which they will not be doing justice towards themselves as well as towards the society at large. Journalists should:

Test the accuracy of information from all sources and exercise care to avoid inadvertent error. Deliberate distortion is never permissible. Diligently seek out subjects of news stories to give them the opportunity to respond to allegations of wrongdoing. Identify sources whenever feasible. The public is entitled to as much information as possible on sources' reliability. Always question sources’ motives before promising anonymity. Clarify conditions attached to any promise made in exchange for information. Keep promises. Make certain that headlines, news...
tracking img