Ethical Table

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University of Phoenix Material Jason Harrison

Ethical Systems Table

Directions:

1. Fill in brief definitions of each primary ethical theory. ➢ Deontological- Duty based approach. Moral obligation or commitment to act in a certain manner. (“Introduction to Ethics for University of Phoenix Students,” n.d.). ➢ Teleological or consequentialism- Goal based. Ethicist’s believe people who practice this type of approach believe there is a design to the universe. Goal is to achieve the most perfect society. (“Introduction to Ethics for University of Phoenix Students,” n.d.). ➢ Rights Based- Norms in society receive their force from the idea of mutual agreement. Certain things are acceptable because the majority of people agree the behavior is acceptable. (“Introduction to Ethics for University of Phoenix Students,” n.d.). ➢ Human Nature- Extremes of human behavior, both good and bad. Practitioners find little room for middle ground. (“Introduction to Ethics for University of Phoenix Students,” n.d.). ➢ Relativistic- People who believe their ethical systems entirely on their feelings in a particular situation. Personalized system with no absolute rights and wrongs. More actions are subject rather than objective. (“Introduction to Ethics for University of Phoenix Students,” n.d.). ➢ Entitlement based - People base their ethical systems entirely on their feelings in a particular situation. Moral decisions based on what’s right for the individual. Relationships and the needs of the business don’t matter. (“Introduction to Ethics for University of Phoenix Students,” n.d.). ➢ Virtue- Highest standard available. Determined by community standards or religious beliefs. (“Introduction to Ethics for University of Phoenix Students,” n.d.).

2. Identify alternate names or variations of each ethical system based on your reading of the text and supplemental materials. ➢ Deontological- Pluralism, moral rights, rights based ➢ Teleological or Consequentialism- Utilitarianism, Consequentialism ➢ Rights Based- Justice, Equality

➢ Human Nature- Egoists, Hedonists, Virtue
➢ Relativistic- Morality is relative to the norms of culture. No universal moral standards. ➢ Entitlement Based- Distributive justice. Justice is Acquisition. ➢ Virtue- Community Standards, Religious training.

(“Introduction to Ethics for University of Phoenix Students,” n.d.).

Match the real-world examples listed below with the corresponding systems. The first one has been completed for you in the table.

a. I believe people should be able to eat sand if they like the taste of it. b. I believe that if sand is going to be eaten, it should be available for everyone to eat. c. I believe people should be able to eat sand because it is the right thing to do. d. I believe people should be able to eat sand because it is good for one’s health. e. I believe people should be able to eat sand if they decide they want to, regardless of whether it is someone else’s sand. f. I believe people should be able to eat sand if they want to because they are free to make the decision themselves. g. I believe I will eat sand because it is the standard meal for my community.

3. Develop your own workplace example that fits with each system. Present each workplace scenario in a substantial paragraph of approximately 40 words. Although the table field will expand to accommodate your workplace examples, you may list them at the end of the table; make a note in the table to see the attached examples, however, so your facilitator knows to look for scenarios below the table.

4. Format references according to APA standards and include them after the table.

|Ethical Theory or |Brief Definition |Other Names for Theory |Real-world Example|Workplace Example | |System |...
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