Ethical Situations with Managers Being Role Models

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Ethical situations with Managers being Role Models


May 5, 2010


For every single, small to large company that exists today, there is always at least one individual who has the title of the Manager. A manager is basically a person within an organization who has management skills and duties to uphold and perform that not everyone in the company necessarily has to do as well. In general, Managers usually get paid more for their salary, and they also hold extra responsibilities at the company that they need to honor in order to please a supervisor, or someone else with a higher ranking at the company.

It is also an important concept to keep in mind that Managers also need to set a good example for other employees at a company, which enables them to be proper role models. Ethical situations where Managers are incorporated as role models is the basis for this paper, so let us now look further into detail about this business concept.

Moral and ethical issues faced by Managers

It is morally and ethically proper for Managers within a company to maintain honesty, integrity, and trust for setting an example to other individuals working below them at a company. When a worker sees a Manager doing their position accurately and with plenty of effort, they’ll tend to follow as an example, and they realize that their Manager might expect the same type of effort being put in for their own position, which can be a great role model and inspiration for them personally when following suit at the company.

A few moral and ethical issues that may be faced by a Manager might include dishonesty, and leadership hypocrisy. An average person cannot maintain honesty in every single given situation, but when it comes to dealing with Managers, it is vital that they try to maintain their honesty with employees every time they are clocked in and working. If Managers do not maintain honesty, it sets a bad example, which eventually makes employees think that dishonesty is a proper policy, which can lead to a dishonest working company.

For leadership hypocrisy, this is a common issue that is known to be hard to manage and control, but with the proper steps hypocrisy can be avoided. The definition for hypocrisy is basically the practice of possessing morals and beliefs that one does not hold or practice (Klebe, 2007). With Managers, it is unethical for them to tell a worker to not do something because it is wrong, then for the Manager to turn around and do the exact same thing it is they told their co-worker not to do. Leadership hypocrisy can be avoided by managers thinking long and hard about what it is they tell their workers to do or not to do. If you have a Manager telling employees and making random concepts and rules, without them thinking this thoroughly through first, you may have a hypocritical Manager on your hands that may not even realize that they are being a hypocrite. As a Manager, not realizing when your being a hypocrite is not only an ethical problem for the company, it’s also an ethical problem that follows you in the real world as well.

A final recommendation step to avoid being hypocritical would be to not give advice or procedures that you are uncertain about. For example, do not tell a worker to never be late on the job, even though in the past you as a Manager have been five minutes late or so previously before you started work. Problems do come up in life, and as a Manager you need to keep openness about that and don’t set impossible standards that an average worker would have a hard time adhering to.

How social and responsible mangement practice relate to Manager role models

In order for you as a Manager to be a successful role model, you need to make sure you understand what ethically responsible management practices might be, and it is also good to realize certain social issues may get in the way of these practices. A few responsible...
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