Ethical Organization Profile

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Ethical Organization Profile

Team A: Brandon Chin, Chris Goodspeed,

Wayne Hood, and David Winters


26 April, 2010
Scott Bridges

Ethical Organization Profile

“The first step in the evolution of ethics is a sense of solidarity with other human beings” (Schweitzer, n.d., ¶5). At A-Team Medical Offices (A-Team Medical), establishing that sense of solidarity by providing a sound ethical environment is our top priority. With such emphasis on ethical standard, A-Team Medical faces many moral and ethical issues on a daily basis, which makes managing the relationship between ethics, morality, and social issues in the legal environment a very difficult task. Nevertheless, with solid ethical guidelines, a proactive training approach, an unparalleled monitoring system, and trustworthy managers to enforce these procedures, A-Team Medical continues to set the industry standard for operating an ethically healthy and productive working environment. Moral and Ethical Issues

Establishing such a high-quality working environment does not come without its share of social pressures. In fact, the medical profession as a whole faces many complicated choices that revolve around patients’ rights, doctor’s responsibilities and society’s moral values. Occasionally, these issues find themselves at odds with each other. For instance, a significant factor in the decision-making process for undergoing medical procedures can be the ability of the patient to comprehend the information provided to him or her on which he or she must base informed decisions. According to Moulton and King (2010), the responsibility resides with the healthcare provider to recognize that a patient’s right to self-decision is only successfully exercised if he or she possesses enough information to make an educated and informed decision. This fine line between divulging information and ensuring said information’s comprehension is just one of the many ethical issues facing our practice.

Medicine becomes increasingly more complicated with new treatments, new technology, and specialization. This has lead to government regulations and insurance industry requirements which, in many cases, limit professionals regarding how patients are treated, although it does not relieve individuals or organizations from acting in a responsible manner to represent and protect the patient. As Ulrich, Hamric and Grady (2010) points out; “ As members of a healthcare community that the public trusts with their most morally significant treatment decisions, physicians, nurses, and other health care providers have an obligation to speak up about their ethical concerns for the patient’s welfare” (p. 2). In regards to said welfare, the American Medical Associated has adopted standards that enable patients to make medical decisions based upon his or her own personal beliefs, values, and goals (Moulton & King, 2010). Physicians are also held accountable to these standards as they must respect the decision of the patient in every circumstance, including situations when the patient’s decision does not “promote their [sic] physical well-being or conform with [sic] the physician’s medical judgment” (Moulton & King, 2010, p.3). For professionals, personal conflicts can occur while conscientiously attempting to meet these expectations. This dilemma of “moral distress” was defined by Andrew Jameton in 1984 as “the inability of a moral agent to act according to his or her core values and perceived obligations due to internal and external constraints” (Ulrich, Hamric & Grady, 2010, p.1). This constant battle - between personal values and those that are imposed by society - challenges professionals to comply and to act honestly and compassionately towards all patients. At A-Team Medical, we take on such challenges with a great deal of pride, persistence and perseverance.

While society may try to dictate more, A-Team Medical understands that it is...
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