Ethical Integrity in the Workplace

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In most organizations, they have orientations that involve training programs for new employees. This is when employers will introduce policies and rules regarding the organizations ethics or codes of conduct. “Once business owners and managers have had business ethics training, the training for employees can begin. This should include existing employees as well as incoming employees. The ethics program should be reviewed with all new employees during the training or orientation period” (Reay, 2009). I believe that these classes and trainings that are being offered should already be a part of us. According to Vincent Ruggiero, “ethics is a descriptive discipline, involving the collection and interpretation of data on what people from various cultures believe, without and consideration for the appropriateness or reasonableness of these beliefs” (2008, pg. 5). So, when sociologist Raymond Baumhart asked business people, “What do ethics mean to you?” Among their replies were the following: “Ethics has to do with what my feelings tell me is right or wrong, Ethics has to do with my religious beliefs, Being ethical is doing what the law requires, Ethics consist of all the standards of behavior our society accepts, I don’t know what the word means” (Velazquez, Andre, Shanks, S.J. ,& Meyer, 1987). All definitions could be true, but to define “ethics” is very hard to do especially when we were not taught the same moral standards.

Our moral status holds a big key to our integrity, whether we are able to be honest or caring, opposed to lying, stealing and hurting a person’s feeling by discriminating against them. Being committed to doing what is right versus what is wrong should be our main focus.
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