Ethical Dilemma

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Running head: ANALYSIS OF AN ETHICAL DILEMMA (PART 2)

An Ethical Dilemma in Global Health Care (Part 2)
The Green Team
Martin Cayer, RN
Merlene Clarke, RN
Shine Kottathil, RN
Biah Kun, RN
Nubia Lomeli, RN
Grand Canyon University
NRS-437V Ethical Decision Making in Health Care Teresa Ortner, RNC, MSNEd May 30, 2012
An Ethical Dilemma in Global Health Care (Part 2)
The purpose of this paper is to present four interviews of a diverse panel of individuals, who share their ethical philosophy and views in relation to the ethical dilemma presented in Part 1. A summary of the interview’s outcomes regarding all issues surrounding ethical dilemma. We will once again state our position on the issue and consider the responses of individuals interviewed, and provide explanation of similarities and differences of responses. With a conclusion providing a recommendation basic on the ethical dilemma. Interview with a Health Administrator

The following interviewee will be called J.C; manager of a 32-bed ICU, she is a female in her mid-forties, a mother and wife as well as of Christian faith. J.C is also a member of the ethics committee in her hospital. J.C is well aware of Terri Schiavo’s debate between pro-life the sanctity of human life verses the advocacy of the right to die. “You would think after a story like Terri’s people would line up to get their advance directives, but sadly they don’t” (personal communication, 2012). Healthcare professionals face ethical and legal implications when patients are unable to voice their autonomy and others contest their fate. According to J.C “Ethically it is the care-giving professions that have the responsibility to adhere to current law, carry out patients’ wishes to the extent possible, and continue to advocate for patients and family members encountering the challenges of end-of-life decisions” (personal communication, 2012). J.C, further expressed how the exposure as healthcare professional influences her views on Terri’s outcome due to her medical state. “The thorough autopsy after her death belied any thought of recovery, given the debilitated state of her brain, especially the cerebral cortex” (O’Rourke, 2007). The principle of respect for human dignity is the core of nursing; however respect for life also includes consideration of the quality of life. My interviewee agreed that no further interventions be done to sustain life, but disagreed on the cruelty of Terri’s resolution. Interview with a Neighbor/Friend

An interview was conducted with a 38-year-old mother of 2 children, who works as an accountant, is married and is also a Christian. For the purpose of this paper she will be referred to as A.G. When asked about her philosophy and worldview regarding the Terri Schiavo’s case, A.G said as a Christian she believes that life is a most precious gift from the Almighty God, and no one has the right to take that gift away from you. A.G went on to say that what happened in Terri’s case was a willful act of murder by the judge, and she firmly believes in the Biblical command “thou shall not kill”. A.G stated that all persons no matter what limitations they have should be treated with dignity and worth, and should be able to live as long as is possible and enjoy life to its fullest. Her expressions echoed the sentiments of well-known Philosopher Immanuel Kant (2007) who said that all persons have an absolute worth simply because they exist and should never be used as a means. A.G commented that Terri’s family dearly loved her and just wanted to take care of her, denying them such privilege and ordering that she be starved of food and water the judge was no better than Hitler. A.G said she couldn’t image going through something like that with any of her children. When A.G was asked if...
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