Essentialism

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THE ‘BASIC’ WAY OF LEARNING
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Abstract
Essentialism as the name suggests, is aimed at instilling essential knowledge and skills to students in there academics. Essentialism is more inclined to the conservative way of learning with emphasis on the basic training of core subjects. This training could be in reading, writing, speaking and computer training. It should be hierarchically passed from the teacher to the students to promote a standardized culture. This philosophical school of thought is seen to emphasis on the teacher being the leader with the role of instilling discipline, order and hard work in the classroom. Lessons should and can only be conducted in a silent and organized classroom. Positive contribution in the class by the student should be rewarded while aggressive behavior should be punished. Being the dominant way of learning implemented in most schools in the United States the movement began in the mid 1930s.In 1938 William C. Bagley journal attacked the progressivism approach to education noting that European student level of learning was superior to the United States who are at the same level. In the 1980 neoessentialism emerged with the sole aim of addressing the challenges facing the education sector in the United States at that time. Neoessentialism advocated for the importance in computer training, the argued that it should be included in the schools curriculum. This philosophy is said to be too rigid and doesn’t focus on the reality outside the classroom thus the students are ill equipped for the outside world. With schools implementing essentialism philosophy the students role in the classroom is questionable as it mainly focuses on the educator. The educator sets and implements the curriculum and the standards that the student should reach.

References:
Cohen, L (1999) philosophical perspectives in the education. Retrieved April 13.2011, from...
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