Essay Rainbow's End

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Oddworld, Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee, Oddworld Inhabitants
  • Pages : 2 (773 words )
  • Download(s) : 136
  • Published : May 12, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Draft Essay

* Start with an interesting sentence about belonging
* Outline the question
* State the two texts
* Thesis
* Outline argument by argument your discussion points

Belonging can enrich our identity and relationships, and can lead to acceptance and understanding. This essay will be comparing and contrasting the ways the concept of Belonging is represented in the play, Rainbow’s End, by Jane Harrison as well as the Playstation 1 videogame Oddworld: Abe’s Oddysee, developed by Oddworld Inhabitants. Rainbow’s End is a portrayal of the harsh realities of life as Indigenous people in the 1950’s. Oddworld: Abe’s Oddysee demonstrates the cruel treatment of Abe and his buddies, the Mudukons, by the Glukkons and Sligs that have enslaved them and now want to slaughter them for profits-sake. Now it is up to Abe to save all his friends and himself. What promotes belonging is a willingness to be accepting of others. Fitting in is encouraged by the motivation to accept others. It is human nature to want to be accepted and accepting others mean they belong. This is evident in Page 189; “Errol: That’s okay, Mrs. Banks. Gladys: Aunty... Anyway, I sure appreciate you taking the time, Errol. Errol: Don’t mention it, Mrs.-Aunty. You sure you wouldn’t like to try something...?” The use of dialogue represents Gladys accepting Errol as part of her family and Errol receives an acceptance of her and her family. This further emphasises the fact that fitting in is encouraged by the motivation of accepting others. Acceptance is influenced by the desire to accept others. However, there are cases in history such as in the 1950’s in Australia when Assimilation was introduced. This showed that the “white fella” did not want Indigenous Aboriginals to belong to the ‘white Australia’ unless they were able to play the part of a typical white Australian. This is portrayed through the use of symbolism in Page 127; “Nan Dear: What hessian? Gladys: The hessian they...
tracking img