Essay on the Healthcare Quality Strategy for Scotland

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Yvonne O'Sullivan

Yvonne O'Sullivan

Health Care Quality Strategy for Scotland
Essay January 2013
Health Care Quality Strategy for Scotland
Essay January 2013

Scotland is a small country comprising of 5.2 million inhabitants, with 22.6% of its population aged 60 or above. Scotland has been distinguished among prosperous western societies for its poor health, with statistics on average more analogous to eastern European countries than with those of Western Europe. Additionally, Scotland has been differentiated within the UK for having a higher degree of mortality than can be justified by its proportion of deprivation. The reasons why Scotland’s health is significantly poorer than other countries is yet to be discovered, however correlations have been made with environmental, financial, behavioural and cultural indicators of population health risks which exist in Scotland (Gordon, Fischer and Stockton 2010). The health care quality strategy has been inaugurated to improve health and well-being for the Scottish people and it provides a framework to guide the NHS professionals who supply healthcare services to the Scottish people to work with the public toward a collective ambition. The NHS has been critisised as a health care system that is multifarious and fragmented—one in need of enhancement (Finkelman and Kenner 2007). Incidentally, the challenges that face the future of nursing will also have substantial repercussions for the delivery of sustainable high quality healthcare; this is compounded by the aging demographic often with numerous and long term illnesses, as well as the presence of health inequalities and mounting expectation all in the context of diminishing monetary funds, dictate that we must construct a strategy that focuses on individual patients rather than the collective and combine our efforts to address these challenges and turn them into opportunities (NHS Scotland 2011). The Quality Strategy endeavours to supply the highest quality healthcare to the Scottish people which will ensure that they highly regard NHS Scotland and consider it to be amongst the finest in the world. The needs and wants prioritised by the Scottish people are the core around which the strategy has been built. The Quality Strategy aspires to steer Scotland toward the provision of world-class health care based on millions of individual care experiences which will are (continually) person centred, clinically effectual and safe. This essay attempts to explain the multidimensional role played by the individual nurse in ensuring that these goals are accomplished (The Scottish Government 2010). The nurse will encounter complex difficulties and dilemmas in delivering this high quality care in the current economic climate; for this reason it is essential to be responsive and enthusiastic about learning new ways of achieving these goals so that the people of Scotland, NHS employees and the health system can thrive.

Scotland has the potential to develop into a world leader in health-care provision due to millions of individual care experiences that are person-centred, clinically effectual and safe. This has been achieved through collaboration between patients, their families and those delivering healthcare services which honour individual requirements and beliefs and which demonstrate benevolence, empathy, continuity, clear communication and shared decision-making (The Scottish Government 2010). Shared decision making can be perceived as an occasion for patients to benefit from professional competence by discussing difficulties in the self-management of their condition. If this opportunity is squandered, it may hinder patient’s ability to self-manage their care and negatively influence their prognosis (Zoffmann, Harder and Kirkevold 2008). To this end, the “one-size fits all” approach adopted by the NHS since the post war years has survived for too long (Department of Health 2001)....
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