Erikson's Theory: the Post-Freudian

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“ERIKSON: POST-FREUDIAN THEORY”

A Report Prepared By:

Maria Blesila F. Heredia
and
Monica V. Potistad

from
BS Psychology 211

ERIK ERIKSON – the person who coined the term “identity crisis”; had no college degree of any kind; gained world fame in an impressive variety of fields including psychoanalysis, anthropology, psychohistory and education. ERIKSON'S NAMES: Erik Salomonsen

Erik Homburger
Erik Homburger Erikson
Erik H. Erikson
ERIKSON'S THREE SEPARATE BELIEFS REGARDING HIS ORIGINS:
Theodor Homburger, a physician and his mother's husband, was his biological father. But he proved that this was incorrect because of some biological proofs which did not match between them. A man named Valdemar Salomonsen, his mother's first husband was his biological father. But he proved this wrong also because he learned that this man left her mother four years before he was born. Lastly, he chose to believe that he was the outcome of a sexual liaison between his mother and an artistically gifted aristocratic Dane. 58 YEARS OLD – Erikson's age when his mother died.

ERIKSON'S BIOGRAPHY

BIRTH DATE: 15 June 1902
BIRTH PLACE: Southern Germany
DEATH: 12 May 1994; 91 years old
PETER BLOS – Erikson's friend who sent him a letter inviting him to teach children in a new school in Vienna. ANNA FREUD – one of the founders of the new school and became not only Erikson's employer but his psychoanalyst also. Advised him to stop searching for his father's identity, which he didn't follow. JOAN SERSON – a Canadian-born dancer, artist, and teacher who had also undergone psychoanalysis, became Erikson's wife with Anna Freud's permission. She also became a valuable editor and occasional coauthor of his books. ERIKSON'S CHILDREN:

Kai and Sue – pursued important professional careers. Jon – shared his father's experience as a wandering artist, worked as a laborer and never felt emotionally close to his parents. Neil – born with a down syndrome. Erikson decided to put him in an institution's care and then lying to his other children saying that their brother was dead at birth. He died at the age of 20. VIOLATED PRINCIPLES WHEN HE LIED TO HIS CHILDREN:

“Don't lie to people you should care for.”
“Don't pit one family member against another.”
VARIOUS PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY OF ERIKSON:
artist
psychologist
psychoanalyst
clinician
professor
cultural anthropologist
existentialist
psychobiographer
public intellectual
1933 – Erikson's family left Vienna for Denmark to get Danish citizenship. Then he left Copanhagen for United States after the Danish officials refused his request of citizenship. NAME CHANGE FROM HOMBURGER TO ERIKSON – represented a retreat from his earlier Jewish identification. MODIFIED PSYCHOANALYTIC PRACTICE – he set up once he settled in Boston. BECAME A RESEARCHER AT:

Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School
Harvard Psychological Clinic
1936 – when Erikson took a position at Yale. But after two and a half years, he moved to University of California at Berkeley. TRIBES HE LIVED WITH:
Sioux nation on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota Yurok nation in Northern California
“CHILDHOOD AND SOCIETY” - Erikson's book published in 1950 that at first glance appears to be a hodgepodge of unrelated chapters. This was because Erikson himself had a hard time finding a common theme for his book. This became a classic and gave Erikson an international reputation as an imaginative thinker and remains the finest introduction to his post-Freudian personality theory 1949 – University of California officials demanded that faculty members sign an oath pledging loyalty to the United States. Erikson refused to sign although he is not a communist....
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