Ergonomics and Workplace Psychology

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Ergonomics and Workplace Psychology (Assessment 2)

Table of Content

Table of Content

………………………………………………...

P.1

1.0 Introduction

…………………………………………………

P.2 - P.3

2.0 Ergonomic Analysis of Workstation

……………………………

P.4 - P.19

3.0 Practical Recommendations ………………………………………

P.20 - P.27

4.0 Conclusion

………………………………………………………

P.28 - P.29

Reference List

………………………………………………………. P.30 - P.35

Page 1 of 35

Ergonomics and Workplace Psychology (Assessment 2)

1.0 INTRODUCTION

DiNhardi (2003:703) states that, “Ergonomics is the science of fitting workplace conditions and job demands to the capabilities of the working population.”

If the jobs require repetitive, forceful or prolonged exertions of the hands, lifting, pushing, pull of heavy objects or prolonged awkward posture, the risk of causing musculoskeletal disorders will be high.

This time, we choose the construction workers to analysis their works.

Tak (2009:665) states that, “Construction workers are exposed to a variety of ergonomic hazards, including awkward postures, heavy lifting, forceful exertions, vibrations and repetitive motions.”

Page 2 of 35

Ergonomics and Workplace Psychology (Assessment 2)

Smallwood (2000:1) has a statistics, “The rate of sprains and strain in construction – 1.8 per 100 full-time equivalent workers – is the second highest of al industries. shoulder.” The top five problems are lower back, knee, wrist/hand, neck and

In order to improve work organizational climate and prevent occupational musculoskeletal disorders in construction industry, we use participative ergonomics to analysis. According to the observations and the assessment results,

there are some recommendations to organizations and workers later on.

Page 3 of 35

Ergonomics and Workplace Psychology (Assessment 2)

2.0 ERGONOMIC ANALYSIS OF WORKSTATION

The ergonomics analysis workstation focuses on identifying hazards and feasible solutions for the major tasks associated with mixing of plaster, the first step of the plastering task.

Pinder, et al. (2001:38) also states, “Plastering is inevitably a heavy manual task because it involves transferring by hand large quantities of a wet and dense material to a wall or ceiling.”

Page 4 of 35

Ergonomics and Workplace Psychology (Assessment 2)

2.1 Tasks of plastering and tiling on construction sites

In Hong Kong, most plasterers will perform both plastering and tiling tasks. Their works can be mainly divided into several areas as below:

1.

Mixing plaster manually by shovelling. (Figure. 1)

2.

Wet plastering is a traditional work which put a thick base coat and a thin skim coat on the walls. block work. (Figure 2) Most likely, this would be done to brick or

3.

Screeding of concrete floor such as applying a surface to the concrete base of a floor. (Figure 3)

4.

Put the tiles on the wall or the floor (Figure 3 & 4).

5.

Apply mortar on the treated spalling area (Figure 5).

Page 5 of 35

Ergonomics and Workplace Psychology (Assessment 2)

Figure 1. a) Mixing plaster by shoveling on floor; b) Mixing plaster by shoveling on the platform

Figure 2. Wet plastering on the wall

Figure 3.

Screeding and tiling on concrete floor

Page 6 of 35

Ergonomics and Workplace Psychology (Assessment 2)

Figure 4.

Tiling on wall near floor level

Figure 5.

Applying mortar on the surface (awkward position)

Figure 6.

Plaster Bag (45 Kg)

Figure 7.

Moving the plaster bag

Page 7 of 35

Ergonomics and Workplace Psychology (Assessment 2)

2.2 Literature review

In order to get more information about ergonomics on plastering field, we have done the research. Unfortunately, it was so little about this the

ergonomic on plastering. Pinder et al. (2001:2) states, “There is no literature on wet plastering nor on floor screeding.”

2.3 Ergonomic Assessment Extent

So this ergonomics assessment tries...
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