Ergonomics

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Ergonomics Guidebook for Manual Production Systems
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The eight rules of ergonomics for work systems

Body height  04

Work area  06

Reach zone  08

Parts presentation  09

Range of vision  10

Lighting  11

Equipment adjustments  12

Planning aids  14

Benefit from ergonomics

Use the advantages of an ergonomically designed workstation system. We can support you with this and provide valuable suggestions. One example is this ergonomics guidebook, which contains the eight key rules of ergonomics, covering the most essential aspects of EN ISO 6385. This guidebook is a reference to help you methodically plan and implement ergonomic workstations and flow racks. Among other things, it takes employee size, tasks, and lighting into account.

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Ergonomics – For motivated employees, higher productivity, and better quality

An ergonomic workstation facilitates work and maintains good employee health. The results: Increased motivation and satisfaction, higher performance, efficiency, and processing quality, as well as fewer absences due to illness. The bottom line: Ergonomics provide you with valuable benefits in the form of higher productivity, increased efficiency, and a decisive edge over the competition – thus ensuring lasting success for your company.

04 06 08 09 10 11 12 14

Body height and working height Work area Reach zone Parts presentation Range of vision Lighting Adjustment of work equipment Planning and design tools

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Body height and working height

Manual workstations must accommodate a wide range of body heights to ensure that the largest percentage of the population is covered. Country-specific differences and regional requirements must also be taken into account. For example, in Germany, DIN 33 406 must be followed when specifying and designing a workstation. The most important factors for designing work equipment are the working height, proper sizing of the reach zones and required leg room, as well as definition of the appropriate range of vision. All of these dimensions are derived from a “standardized” body height. Classification of body heights The body heights of the population can be classified into four groups: f Group 1: Smallest woman (only 5% are smaller) f Group 2: Average woman and smallest man f Group 3: Largest woman and average man f Group 4: Largest man (only 5% are larger)

Definition of the optimum working height The optimum working height is based on the body height range and the type of activity to be performed (see table). If you take all body heights into consideration, the average optimum working height for average requirements is 1125 mm for sit-down/stand-up workstations. Work contents Working heights in mm Group 1 High requirements for Visual inspection Fine motor skills Medium requirements for Visual inspection Fine motor skills Low requirements for Visual inspection High requirements for Elbow-room 1100 Group 2 1200 Group 3 1250 Group 4 1350

1000

1100

1150

1250

900

1000

1050

1150

Average optimum working height = 1125 Grouping of body heights in Germany: In accordance with DIN 33 402 and DIN EN ISO 7250 Average optimum working height: For all four population groups

Frequency

1125 mm ± 100 mm

1%

5%

50%

95%

99%

Men: Women: Group 1

1650 mm 1535 mm Group 2

1750 mm 1625 mm Group 3

1855 mm 1720 mm Group 4 Group 1 1535 mm Group 2 1640 mm Group 3 1740 mm Group 4 1855 mm

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Definition of the table height The table height follows from the optimum working height minus the height of the workpiece or insertion point. To ensure sufficient leg room for those in body height group 4 as well, we recommend a minimum height of 1000 mm for sit-down and stand-up workstations. Further criteria that must be taken into account: f Foot and leg room, depth and adjustment range of the footrest f Size and variation of workpiece dimensions f Occurring forces and weights f Greatly...
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