Equivalence in Translation

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  • Topic: Translation, Literal translation, Dynamic and formal equivalence
  • Pages : 11 (2933 words )
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  • Published : March 13, 2013
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EQUIVALENCE IN TRANSLATION: SOME PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGIES | | |By Nababan, PhD | Published  10/21/2008 | Translation Theory | Recommendation:[pic][pic][pic][pic][pic] | | |Contact the author | | |Quicklink: http://www.proz.com/doc/2071 | | |[pic][pic][pic][pic] | | | | | | | | |Author: | |Nababan, PhD | |Indonesia | |English to Indonesian translator | |  | |View all articles by Nababan, PhD | | | |See this author's ProZ.com profile | |1. Introduction | | | |In any account of interlingual communication, translation is used as a generic term. Professionally, however, the term translation is | |confined to the written, and the term interpretation to the spoken (Newmark, 1991: 35). If confined to a written language, translation is a | |cover term with three distinguishable meanings: 1) translating, the process (to translate; the activity rather than the tangible object), 2)| |a translation: the product of the process of translating (e.g. the translated text), and 3) translation: the abstract concept which | |encompasses both the process of translating and the product of that process Bell (1991: 13). The term 'translation' used and discussed | |throughout this paper is confined to the written language, and refers to both the product and process of translating. | | | |The definitions of translation suggested above imply that producing the same meaning or message in the target language text as intended by | |the original author is the main objective of a translator. This notion of 'sameness' is often understood as an equivalence relation between | |the source and target texts. This equivalence relation is generally considered the most salient feature of a quality translation. | | | |2. Problems of Equivalence...
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