Environmental Threats

Page 1 of 7

Environmental Threats

By | May 2001
Page 1 of 7
Contemporary Issues
Environmental threats

Overpopulation

Every 20 minutes, the world adds another 3,500 human lives but loses one or more entire species of animal or plant life - at least 27,000 species per year. ZGP July 1999 World population growth peaked at about two percent per year in the early 1960s. Latest population figures indicate that the rate of growth has slowed to 1.33 percent annually, equivalent to 78 million people a year. UNFPA 1999 The highest world population growth rate was 2.04 percent in the late 1960's. This year, it is about 1.31 percent. NY Times World population growth is equivalent to around three babies every second. UNFPA '99 New inhabitants add the equivalent of a city the size of San Francisco to world population every three day

The world population is growing fast and the effects of this are  food shortages
 exhaustion of farm land and soil erosion
 insufficient power supplies
 social un-rest and war
 immense pressure on welfare system and national benefits  crime due to lack of space and jobs

The world in the future will be able to support less NOT more people this is due to carefully farmed areas losing there top-soil (the cause is over farming), but the world needs more and not less food so larger fields are required but these large fields allow soil and wind erosion to happen more quickly. Fertilisers only speed up this erosion e.g. America (Arizona) land is useless and dusty because of the chemicals poisoning the land. Also in places such as Egypt where the water supply is irrigated from underground water supplies, the water contains mineral salts, which will slowly poison the land.

We can say that overpopulation can effect the police in a dramatic way, as the ratio between a police officer and the public is increasing. This can effect the police officers productivity and effectiveness in dealing with crime. We can say that Public services in...