Entrepreneur: Entrepreneurship and Active Class Participation

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Elizabethtown College
Business Department

BA 380: Entrepreneurship

Course Syllabus – Fall 2005

“What matters in the new economy is not return on investment, but return on imagination.”

Gary Hamel

Professor:Dr. Petru Sandu
Office:117 Nicarry Hall
Phone:(717) 361-1269 (office)
E-Mail:sandup@etown.edu
Office Hours:T 8:00am – 9:00am, 1:00pm-2:00pm, Th. 8:00am – 9:00am, 1:00pm-2:00pm, 5:30pm – 6:30pm and by appointment Classroom: N127 T & Th. 11am – 12:40pm
Course Materials:
1. Hisrich, R.D., Peters, M.P., Entrepreneurship, Sixth Edition, Irwin/McGraw-Hill, 2005 (ISBN 0-07-287374-4) 2. Readings: the articles are on reserve at the High Library. 2. Business Week, Forbes, Entrepreneur Magazine, Inc. Magazine, Fast Company. 4. Recommended Book: Spencer Johnson, Who Moved My Cheese?

Course Philosophy

Entrepreneurship is about changing the world and creating something new in unusual ways. . Entrepreneurs are fantastic learners. They are self-competing individuals who strive to achieve excellence. Consequently, my expectations for this class are high. This course is a sum of challenges, an exciting journey in discovering yourself. This is not about impressing the professor but impressing yourself and your peers.

Entrepreneurship course provides students the opportunity to assess and develop their entrepreneurial skills. The class emphasizes a “hands-on” approach based on class discussion and interaction, case studies on entrepreneurial ventures, final project, presentations, experiential exercises and executive speakers (entrepreneurs, investors and consultants). The topics covered in class will enable students to understand the entrepreneur’s profile and to acquire knowledge and skills necessary to create, start, finance, manage, and grow a new venture. However, this is not a “how-to” type of class.

Course Objectives:
1. To offer both the academic and real world perspective on the entrepreneurial process and to develop the ability of applying the class materials.

2. To understand the entrepreneurial traits and abilities required as an entrepreneur.

2. To develop persuasive verbal and written communication skills and build up the abilities to work in entrepreneurial teams.

3. To foster creativity, initiative and entrepreneurial way of thinking.

4. To expose students to the benefits and challenges associated with an entrepreneurial career path.

Course Method
Classes will be as interactive as possible and challenging following a seminar format. The class philosophy is to spur creative thinking, initiative and participation. Discussion in this class is the main learning tool. Note that this applies to all class activities: lectures, case studies, team and individual exercises, and executive speakers’ presentations. For a successful learning experience, timely reading, study, and active class participation are essential. All chapters, cases, other readings and applications should be completed BEFORE class on the assigned dates and each student should be willing to discuss them in class. As a result, you will have the opportunity to involve yourself in the class discussion and to ask pertinent questions. To facilitate the discussions, at the end of each class I give students a list of questions that covers the most important topics for the next class. Consider each class a simulation of an entrepreneurial team meeting. Consequently, you are required to be punctual, well prepared, energetic and eager to convey your business views. During the semester, you will work in teams on two cases covering key issues in entrepreneurship. You are required to write for both cases a team report. In addition, a team project, an interview with an entrepreneur and an individual presentation will be required. Two examinations are planned during the semester. In business world, if you go beyond a certain deadline you can miss valuable...
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