Eniac

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Eniac
Eniac Creation:
The ENIAC (Electrical Numerical Integrator And Calculator) was created by John Mauchly and John Presper Eckert at the University of Pennsylvania’s Moore School of Electrical Engineering. The ENIAC was the first computer developed in the United States. The ENIAC was programmed by Jean Bartik. She was the first woman to program the ENIAC. John Mauchly was the chief consultant and John Presper Eckert was the chief engineer. John Presper Eckert obtained his Bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in 1941 and his Master's degree in 1943 which qualified him to be chief engineer.  John Mauchly obtained his Bachelor's, Master's and Doctorate degree at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland in physics. It was when John Eckert was a graduate student, he met John Mauchly. It was sponsored by the United States military during the Second World War. It was to be used to calculate artillery-firing tables which would be used for different weapons for target accuracy. The ENIAC contained approximately 17,500 vacuum tubes, and was linked together by 500,000 soldered connections. The ENIAC took up about a fifty foot long basement and weighted thirty tons. But the ENIAC was completed in 1946; one year after the war was over and it took about 500,000 dollars to build the ENIAC. Even though the war was over, The US Military was still used the ENIAC to perform the calculations for the design of a hydrogen bomb, weather prediction, and wind-tunnel design. In 1946 after the creation of the ENIAC, John Presper Eckert and John Mauchly started the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation. In which they created "the BINAC (Binary Automatic) computer which used magnetic tape to store and access data." Jean Bartik also helped to develop the BINAC as well as the UNIVAC computer, both created by Eckert and Mauchly. "John Presper Eckert and John Mauchly both received the IEEE Computer Society Pioneer Award in 1980."

Citations MLA:
1. Bellis, Mary. "The...
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