English Journal

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“Within the diamond haze of the beach something dark was fumbling along. Ralph saw it first and watched till the intentness of his gaze drew all eyes that way. Then the creature stepped from mirage on to clear sand, and they saw that the darkness was not all shadow but mostly clothing. The creature was a party of boys, marching approximately in step in two parallel lines and dressed in strangely eccentric clothing." (Golding 1954, Ch.1, p.19) | This analysis explores the literary feature characterization.In this passage of the novel Golding describes the setting as “the diamond haze of the beach” to make the reader experience darkness and mystery, as if the reader is actually there. But not just the setting is important in this passage. The author’s choice of words to characterize the choir boys is impeccable. In this quotation the readers see the mysterious “creature” coming closer and closer to the two boys, Ralph and Piggy. Golding uses imagery to make the reader experience this spooky event. It is evident in the phrase “Then the creature stepped from mirage on to clear sand, and they saw that the darkness was not all shadow but mostly clothing.” By using the noun “creature”, Golding instills a scary, horrifying appearance to the group of boys. Also, he uses the word “mirage” to provide the reader with a mysterious, almost horror-like feeling as the group comes closer and closer. These nouns signify mysteriousness and darkness, providing the readers with a spooky, eerie atmosphere which helps us understand that the group of boys seem dangerous. This passage is taken from the author’s point-of-view and it makes a great impact on the reader. |

“That’s enough!” said Ralph sharply, and snatched back the conch. “If you didn’t you didn’t. “-then you come up here an’ pinch my specs-” Jack turned on him. “You shut up!”(Golding 1954, Ch.2, p.46)| This analysis explores the literary feature imagery. In this dialogue of the novel Golding shows an argument between...
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