English Conjunctions

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  • Topic: Dependent clause, Grammatical conjunction, Sentence
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Conjunctions
A conjunction is a word which joins two sentences to complete their meaning. There are two kinds of conjunctions:
1. Co-ordinating Conjunctions: When the conjunction is used to join two statements of equal importance, the conjunction is said to be a co-ordinating conjunction. Examples : and, but, or, not, for, either, neither

 
2. Subordinating Conjunctions: When the conjunction joins two statements, one of which depends on the other for its full meaning, the conjunction is said to be a subordinating conjunction. Examples : before, after, since, because, if, though, which, who A conjunction is a joiner, a word that connects (conjoins) parts of a sentence. There seem to be three basic types of conjunctions. They are: coordinating conjunctions used to connect two independent clauses, subordinating conjunctions used to establish the relationship between the dependent clause and the rest of the sentence, and correlative conjunctions which always travel in pairs, joining various sentence elements that should be treated as grammatically equal. COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS

Coordinating conjunctions may join single words, or they may join groups of words, but they must always join similar elements: e.g. subject+subject, verb phrase+verb phrase, sentence+sentence. The seven coordinating conjunctions in English are: FOR - is to introduce the reason for the preceding clause

AND - joins two similar ideas together
NOR - The conjunction nor is not extinct, but it is not used nearly as often as the other conjunctions. Its most common use is as the little brother in the correlative pair, neither-nor BUT - joins two contrasting ideas together

OR - joins two alternative ideas
YET - is very similar to 'but' as it also joins two contrasting ideas together SO - shows that the second idea is the result of the first
An easy way to remember these six conjunctions is to think of the word FANBOYS. Each of the letters in this somewhat unlikely word is the first letter of one of the coordinating conjunctions. Among the coordinating conjunctions, the most common, of course, are AND, BUT and OR.  

SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS
A subordinating conjunction is a word which joins together a dependent clause and an independent clause. There are numerous subordinating conjunctions. The more commonly used ones are listed below. For a more comprehensive list see http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/conjunctions.htm#nor BECAUSE, AS, SINCE - are used to introduce the cause in a cause effect relationship between two ideas SO - introduces an effect in a cause effect relationship between two ideas ALTHOUGH, (even) THOUGH, WHEREAS, WHILE - are used to express contrast between ideas AFTER - is used to show time

Although documentation of the developmental order of the remaining subordinate conjunctions is missing, the best guess scenario would be: BECAUSE and SINCE, as they also introduce the cause in a cause-effect relationship SO would likely seem to follow as it introduces the effect in a cause-effect relationship ALTHOUGH, (even) THOUGH, WHEREAS, WHILE may follow next as they express the contrast between ideas AFTER which expresses time concepts

COrrelative CONJUNCTIONS
Some conjunctions combine with other words to form what are called correlative conjunctions. They always travel in pairs, joining various sentence elements that should be treated as grammatically equal. Here is a brief list of common correlative conjunctions. both . . . andnot only . . . but alsonot . . . buteither . . . orneither . . . norwhether . . . oras . . . as| Types of Conjunctions

A conjunction is a word that links words, phrases, or clauses. There are three types of conjunctions: coordinating conjunctions, correlative conjunctions, and subordinating conjunctions. Coordinating Conjunctions may join single words, or they may join groups of words, but they must always join similar elements such as subject+subject, verb phrase+verb phrase, or sentence+sentence....
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