English Commentary

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Michael McIntyre “Ian I’m on train” commentary
Michael McIntyre is seen as camp, slightly oriental, straight guy with a family. His friendly bubbly persona appeals to the general public as many of his anecdotes are based on real life situations that he along with the general public have encountered. McIntyre’s persona and comic effect are enhanced by the visual acts he performs on stage, the use of his hands; facial expressions and tone of voice (prosodies) bring his anecdotes to life and allows him to interact with the audience these are paralinguistic features. McIntyre’s style of delivery and lexical choices are different to every comedy sketch he does, in the sketch “Ian I’m on train” McIntyre uses different tones of voice to express certain parts of his anecdotes, in line 10 “can I help you with that bag” McIntyre uses the prosodic of deeper tone of voice to stress the point he is making about the man he is describing. Also in the lines 9 and 10 he uses facial expressions paralinguistic features that also help to bring his anecdote to life and show the character he is describing. Although he comes across as calm and presents himself well through his movement and speech, sometimes throughout his anecdotes he mess up and he repairs himself in line 12 he repeats the word “he went …he went Ian”, this can also help to stress his point. Also throughout the anecdote he uses fillers in line 1 he starts his anecdote “umm.. errr” these filled pause indicate that he possibly is nervous and he’s trying his best to remember his lines. The conversation is taking place on a packed public train, in front of the general public, the man’s conversation is not private which allows McIntyre to overhears his conversation and then relay it to other people as a comedy sketch, using his lexical choices. There are different types grammar that are used throughout this transcript, firstly looking at the structure of the utterances, at the start of the transcript McIntyre uses...
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