Engineering Heat Report

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H8 HEAT AND SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY
ENB130 SEM 1 PRAC 2

JOSHUA KEARNEY; n8351937, PARTNER: Mike Lagendyk

2011
Joshua Kearney
Queensland university of Technology
5/16/2011
H8 HEAT AND SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY
ENB130 SEM 1 PRAC 2

JOSHUA KEARNEY; n8351937, PARTNER: Mike Lagendyk

2011
Joshua Kearney
Queensland university of Technology
5/16/2011

Aim
To measure the Latent heat of fusion of ice.
Introduction/ Background
Within this experiment all units implemented were converted to SI units and all data was recorded to four significant digits. Therefore, all distances were measured in metres, time in seconds and weight in kilograms. In order to determine the Latent heat of fusion of ice the following equations were utilized: * Q=miLf [1]

* Q=mcΔT [2]
* Qi= mFLF+micwΔT i [3]
* Qw+Qc=mwcwT2-T1+mccc(T2-T1) [4]
* miLf+micwΔTi+mwcwT2-T1+mcccT2-T1=0 [5]
* LF = mwcwT2-T1+mcccT2-T1-micwΔTimi [6]
* c = QmΔT [7]
* mmcmTf-Tm+mwcwTf-Tw+mcccTf-Tc=0 [8]
* cm= (mccc+mwcw)(Tf-Tw)mm(Tm-Tf) [9]
Notation used in this report:
* C = Specific Heat
* m = mass
* T = temperature
* Q = Energy
* Lf = Latent heat of fusion

Experimental Method:
PART A – Latent Heat
1. The calorimeter and stirrer were weighed by themselves. The calorimeter was then half filled with water and weighed again. Calculations were then conducted to find the mass of water inserted. 2. Diagram of a Calorimeter, Retrieved from: http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/distance/sci122/Programs/p21/p21.html Diagram of a Calorimeter, Retrieved from: http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/distance/sci122/Programs/p21/p21.html The timing procedure labelled ‘Apparatus and Description’, located in the appendices, was followed, recording the temperature before, during and after the ice was added at 30 second intervals. The ice-water mixture was also stirred slowly and continuously throughout the experiment. The set-up of the calorimeter can be seen in the diagram to the right. 3. The mass of the ice added to the calorimeter was then determined by weighing the calorimeter after the ice had finished melting. The difference in weight from before and after the experiment was understood to be the mass of the ice. 4. A graph was then plotted for the test showing the temperature versus time and an estimated temperature drop due to the ice being added was recorded. 5. Equation 6 was then used along with the Specific heat of water and copper in order to calculate the Latent heat of fusion of ice. PART B – Specific Heat Capacity

1. Enough tap water was added to the calorimeter so that it just covered the thermometer bulb. The calorimeter was then weighed. The mass of water inserted was then calculated using the previous weight of the calorimeter. 2. The temperature of the calorimeter and water was recorded. 3. Diagram of Electronic hot plate used in experiment, Retrieved from: http://www.humboldtmfg.com/c-8-p-498-id-8.html Diagram of Electronic hot plate used in experiment, Retrieved from: http://www.humboldtmfg.com/c-8-p-498-id-8.html The metals being used within the experiment were then weighed and immersed in continuously boiling water until it was believed the metals were at approximately the same temperature as the boiling water. The diagram of the heat plate located to the right was used to heat the water and metal. 4. The heated metal was then quickly and carefully transferred to the calorimeter using the tongs supplied. 5. The water within the calorimeter was continuously stirred and the maximum temperature was recorded. 6. Steps 1 to 5 were then repeated for the other 2 samples of metal. 7. From the data recorded the specific heat of one metal was calculated. Results

Table of masses (for calculations):
ITEM| MASS (g)|
Wooden Lid| 22.80|
Calorimeter, Stirrer and Lid| 140.5|
Calorimeter, Stirrer, Lid and Water| 223.0|
Calorimeter, Stirrer, Lid, Water and Melted Ice...
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