Engineering Health and Safety

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Health and Safe Legislation and Regulation

You are required to research two different engineering environments that you have come knowledge of. It may be best if one is an electrical environment and one a mechanical environment. For each of these environments:

• Identify a minimum of four different sets of regulations that would be relevant

• Describe a minimum of three key features of each of the sets of regulations you have chosen.

Mechanical

Provisional and Use of Work Equipment (PUWER) 1998

Working in engineering requires an extensive range of machinery. The provision and use of work equipment regulations defines work equipment as any machinery appliances, hand tool, power tool or assembly of components.

To protect everybody who uses equipment at work, the regulations require employers to ensure that:

• Work equipment is maintained

• All machinery is suitable and fit for purpose

• Controls on machines are clearly marked

• Work equipment is inspected on a regular basis

• Dangerous parts of work equipment are guarded as far as reasonably practical

• Training and instruction is given to anyone who needs to use the equipment

• Warning signs are fixed either on or close to machinery

Manual Handling Operations Regulations (MHO) 1992

A third of all injuries at work are the results of people using incorrect manual handling methods. Employers should ensure that their staff avoid manual handling any items in such a way that could cause them injury. If manually handling cannot be avoided then a risk assessment must be carried out. This includes:

• The load to be moved

• The capacity of the individual doing the work

• The task or activity that needs to be carried out

• The working environment

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COHH) regulations 2002

COHH regulations are designed to ensure the safe use and handling of hazardous chemicals in engineering. Some chemicals such as petrol and oils can be absorbed into the body through your skin and eyes. Others can enter your body through cuts and grazes.

• Appreciate that some chemicals are more hazardous than others

• Understand that some will harm faster than others

• Always wash your hands before eating or drinking

• Always use the correct type of personal protection equipment (PPE)

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) 1995

All accidents, incidents, (near misses) and dangerous occurrences in the workplace must be reported. The reporting procedure should be explained to new employees in their first few days at work.

An employer has a legal duty to report certain types of injuries, diseases, dangerous occurrences and gas releases. The reports are used by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to analyse health and safety trends and to compile statistics on the numbers of different types of accidents.

A responsible person, usually a manager or a supervisor, has to report serious accidents and incidents as soon as possible to the HSE, either by telephone or online. This same person has to complete RIDDOR form F2508, and send it to the HSE within 10 days.

An accident must be notified when a person dies or suffers a serious injury at work. Serious injuries include:

• Any injury requiring a stay in hospital of more than 24 hours.

• The fracture of any bone, except a finger or spine.

• A dislocation of a shoulder, hip, knee or spine

• Permanent temporary loss of sight

Electrical

Workplace (Health Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992

The workplace Regulations are concerned with general safety and welfare in engineering workplaces. They ensure that you can enter and exit from any park of the workplace in a safe manner. The regulations also require that:

• All fixtures and fittings are maintained and kept clean

•...
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