Engineering

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  • Topic: Heat exchanger, Heat transfer, Shell and tube heat exchanger
  • Pages : 8 (2354 words )
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  • Published : April 30, 2013
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Ministry of Higher Education
King Soud University

College of Engineering

Chemical Engineering Department

Research Title :-

Shell and Tube

Heat Exchanger

[pic]Name:- Moh'd Saad Jalmood

No.:- 425104886

Dr.:- Malek Al Ahmed

Subject :- ChE 313 (( Heat Transfer ))

Introduction:-

A shell and tube heat exchanger is a class of heat exchanger designs. It is the most common type of heat exchanger in oil refineries and other large chemical processes, and is suited for higher-pressure and higher-temperature applications. As its name implies, this type of heat exchanger consists of a shell (a large pressure vessel) with a bundle of tubes inside it. One fluid runs through the tubes, and another fluid flows over the tubes (through the shell) to transfer heat between the two fluids. The set of tubes is called a tube bundle, and may be composed by several types of tubes: plain, longitudinally finned, etc.

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A heat exchanger is a device for transferring heat from one fluid to another, where a solid wall separates the fluids so that they never mix. They are widely used in refrigeration, air conditioning, space heating, power production, and chemical processing. One common example of a heat exchanger is the radiator in a car, in which the hot radiator fluid is cooled by the flow of air over the radiator surface. (2)

Theory and Application:-

Two fluids, of different starting temperatures, flow through the heat exchanger. One flows through the tubes (the tube side) and the other flows outside the tubes but inside the shell (the shell side). Heat is transferred from one fluid to the other through the tube walls, either from tube side to shell side or vice versa. The fluids can be either liquids or gases on either the shell or the tube side. In order to transfer heat efficiently, a large heat transfer area should be used, leading to the use of many tubes. In this way, waste heat can be put to use. This is an efficient way to conserve energy. Heat exchangers with only one phase (liquid or gas) on each side can be called one-phase or single-phase heat exchangers. Two-phase heat exchangers can be used to heat a liquid to boil it into a gas (vapor), sometimes called boilers, or cool a vapor to condense it into a liquid (called condensers), with the phase change usually occurring on the shell side. Boilers in steam engine locomotives are typically large, usually cylindrically-shaped shell-and-tube heat exchangers. In large power plants with steam-driven turbines, shell-and-tube surface condensers are used to condense the exhaust steam exiting the turbine into condensate water which is recycled back to be turned into steam in the steam generator.

Shell and tube heat exchanger Types:-

There can be many variations on the shell and tube design. Typically, the ends of each tube are connected to plenums (sometimes called water boxes) through holes in tubesheets. The tubes may be straight or bent in the shape of a U, called U-tubes. U-Tubes

The Shell and Tube (u-tube) is the most common type of heat exchanger used in the process, petroleum, chemical and HVAC industries, it contains a number of parallel u-tubes inside a shell. Shell Tube heat exchangers are used when a process requires large amounts of fluid to be heated or cooled. Due to their design, shell tube heat exchangers offer a large heat transfer area and provide high heat transfer efficiency.

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In nuclear power plants called pressurized water reactors, large heat exchangers called steam generators are two-phase, shell-and-tube heat exchangers which typically have U-tubes. They are used to boil water recycled from a surface condenser into steam to drive the turbine to produce power. Most shell-and-tube heat exchangers are either 1, 2, or 4 pass designs on the tube side. This refers to the number of times the fluid in the tubes passes through the fluid in the shell....
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