Employee Welfare Programs

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Running head: EMLOYEE WELFARE PROGRAMS

Employee Welfare Programs
Dawn Hook
Baker College of Cadillac
Human Resources and Employment Law
HRM401R
Sally Randall
June 8, 2010

Abstract
This research will provide basic information regarding three employee welfare programs signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1935. The programs included in this research paper are the social security program, the workers’ compensation program, and the unemployment compensation program instituted in the United States. The history surrounding these unique programs as well as provisions and concepts involving all three programs will be discussed. The research will include brief instructions on how to file a claim for both workers’ compensation and unemployment compensation.

Employee Welfare Programs
It seems unimaginable to live in a world without the benefits of three employee welfare programs, the social security act, the worker’s compensation program, and the unemployment compensation program. All three social welfare programs came into existence at about the same time. Many American’s lives have been changed dramatically by the administration of these programs. Therefore, the thesis statement for this research paper is: Without the inception of social security, workers’ compensation, and unemployment compensation, many American citizens would be in financial ruin and unable to live their lives as they normally would. Prior to the 1930s, most all Americans lived their lives without the benefits of the welfare programs and suffered financial deprivation because of it. The research done for this paper will concentrate on the history surrounding social security, workers’ compensation, and unemployment compensation. Many provisions and concepts regarding these programs will be explored as well. In addition, the research will provide brief instructions on how to file claims for both workers’ compensation and unemployment compensation. Hopefully, the readers of this paper will be better informed about the history, provisions, and benefits regarding these welfare programs. Purpose of Study

The purpose of this study is to inform the readers about the history, provisions, and benefits of the social security program, the workers’ compensation program, and the unemployment program which came into existence in the United States in 1935. The study was undertaken in partial fulfillment of the requirements of HRM401R, a course required in the Bachelor of Business Leadership program at Baker College in Cadillac, MI. Limitations of Study

There was a vast amount of information given on the topics of social security, workers’ compensation, and unemployment compensation when conducting research for this paper. Due to the required length of this paper and required amount of time to complete the research (10 weeks), many of the topics discussed are explained as briefly as possible and yet with accuracy. There was no original research done; therefore, only secondary sources were used. Review of Literature

In today’s world, the concept of not having employee welfare programs established seems absurd. Although less than 100 years ago, the American people as well as many people around the world usually had to depend on their communities, societies, churches, or their family for various types of “aid when their incomes were temporarily or permanently disrupted” (Cihon & Castagnera, 2008, p. 310). The term societies refer to different work groups such as the Pennsylvania coal miners. In the 1870s, they were members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, a society that created funds to help widows or children of miners that were killed on the job. Many other societies aided their members in the same way. Beginning in the early 1930s, the United States government started to enact policies to establish assistance “to workers affected by unemployment, on-the-job injuries, work-related...
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