Employee Voice

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Aim Objectives Provide an overview for the presented discussion on employee voice Identify voice practices which represent an example of direct employee involvement and an example of representative participation Primary Research Methods Desk based research Analysed and assessed information; data and presented in report format Internet research focussed on Employee Voice Practices, Human Resource Management, Employee Involvement and Employee Participation, Unionised and non-unionised workplaces, Trade unions and collective bargaining Journal articles including Dundon and Wilkinson (2006), Employee Participation, chapter 15; CIPD (2005), (2009); Glover (2001), Communication and consultation in a greenfield site company; Bryson et al (2007), Employee Voice and Human Resource Management Section 3 Introduction The aforementioned ‘employee relations’ and ‘industrial relations’ require an explanation of their terms in order to fully grasp the prevalence they hold within the context of this report, to this day they proceed to coexist in modern workplaces, however changes are afoot. (Leat, 2007) Section 4 Representative Participation 4.2 Weaknesses The weakness of the value to the employee in this argument and suggested by Fürstenburg, (1993) is at best the somewhat alienating effects of the formalities and political bureaucracy that surrounds unions and representative participation. Furthermore the union’s lack of scope in the workplace mainly focussing on wage disputes and alike can be seen as a weak form of voice in the workplace For the purpose of this report an example of a ‘suggestion scheme’ practice will be explored. An interesting feature of the presented example is even though it is addressed as direct (EI) it coexists with union representation adding fuel to Fürstenburg (1993) idea of dualism. The featured example requires individuals to actually use the system, challenge and question practices used and to present the ideas, what if no one has a good idea that fits with corporate approval? It offers very little strength in the form of collective bargaining and could be limited to addressing only very small changes in workplace practices. Furthermore it could be seen as extra work and actually act as a de-motivator for staff and overall weaken productivity if not managed correctly. (Paton, 2004) Section 6 Conclusion Books and Journals Ackers, Peter; Marchington, Mike; Wilkinson, Adrian and Dundon, Tony (2003), Partnership and Voice, With or Without Trade Unions: Changing UK Management Approaches to Organisational Participation, Loughborough University, Business School, Research Series, 4 Bryson, Alex ; Willman, Paul; Gomez, Rafael and Kretschmer, Tobias (2007) Employee Voice and Human Resource Management: An Empirical Analysis using British Data, Policy studies Institute Dundon, Tony and Wilkinson, Adrian, (2006) "Chapter 15 : Employee Participation", Redman, Tom and Wilkinson, Adrian, Contemporary Human Resource Management: Text & Cases, 382-404, Prentice Hall Furstenberg, Friedrich, (1993), Individual and Representative Participation, Dualism or Dilemma? Research and Practice in Human Resource Management, 1(1), 53-66 Gennard, John and Judge, Graham (2005), Employee Relations (4th edition), Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development Leat, Mike (2007), Exploring Employee Relations (second edition), Butterworth Heinneman Leat, Mike (2001), Exploring Employee Relations, Elsevier Redman, Tom and Wilkinson, Adrian (2006) Contemporary Human Resource Management; Text & Cases (second edition), FT Prentice Hall Websites The Department for Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform, How does Informing and Consulting employees operate in the business world?,[online] Available from: http://www.berr.gov.uk/whatwedo/employment/employment-legislation/ice/information-consultation/page37920.html [Accessed 27th February 2009] Bibliography...
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