Employee Safety, Health and Welfare Law Paper

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Employee Safety, Health and Welfare Law Paper
The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) are two pieces of legislation passed to protect employee’s rights and their families. The purpose of this paper is first to explain the application and implication of Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Worker’s Compensation Occupational and Safety and Health Act (OSHA), and the regulatory laws implemented by my organization in order to adhere to these mandates, while providing the employee with a safe working environment. In addition, the paper will examine the responsibilities that employer has under the law and what protection the law provide for employees. Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

Family and Medical Leave Act was signed by President Bill Clinton on February 3, 1993.The ct was enacted because employees with family emergencies could not take time off without most likely losing their job. The FMLA is designed to help employees balance their work and family responsibilities by allowing them to take reasonable unpaid leave for certain family and medical reasons, including serious health conditions that prevent the employee from working. Not only has the FMLA evolved over the years, but also the current application in the workplace environment is very complex for the employee as well as the employer. FMLA covers private sector employers that employ 50 or more individuals within 75 miles radius. Public employers are covered under FMLA regardless how many workers they employ. The FMLA requires covered employers to provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave to eligible employees for childbirth or care of a child, adoption, their own serious illness or that of a close family member. To be eligible for FMLA, the employee needs to be working for at least 12 months prior to the beginning of the leave for their employer. However, those 12 months do not need to be consecutive (Bennett-Alexander & Hartman,...
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