Employee-Customer-Profit Chain at Sears

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The Employee-CustomerProfit Chain at Sears

by Anthony J. Rucci, Steven P. Kirn, and Richard T. Quinn

Harvard Business Review
Reprint 98109

This document is authorized for use by weijia zhao, from 8/27/2012 to 12/4/2012, in the course: MGI 601: Workforce Management - Everest (Fall 2012), University at Buffalo (SUNY). Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited.

This document is authorized for use by weijia zhao, from 8/27/2012 to 12/4/2012, in the course: MGI 601: Workforce Management - Everest (Fall 2012), University at Buffalo (SUNY). Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited.

HarvardBusinessReview
JANUARY – FEBRUARY 1998
Reprint Number
ROBERT SIMONS
AND ANTONIO DAVILA

HOW HIGH IS YOUR RETURN ON MANAGEMENT?

98110

ANTHONY J. RUCCI, STEVEN P. KIRN,
AND RICHARD T. QUINN

THE EMPLOYEE-CUSTOMER-PROFIT CHAIN AT SEARS

98109

KEVIN P. COYNE AND RENEE DYE

THE COMPETITIVE DYNAMICS OF
NETWORK-BASED BUSINESSES

98103

JOAN MAGRETTA

GOVERNING THE FAMILY-OWNED ENTERPRISE:
AN INTERVIEW WITH FINLAND’S KRISTER AHLSTROM

98107

DAVE ULRICH

A NEW MANDATE FOR HUMAN RESOURCES

98111

JAY A. CONGER, DAVID FINEGOLD,
AND EDWARD E. LAWLER III

APPRAISING BOARDROOM PERFORMANCE

98102

WARREN D. MILLER

HBR CASE STUDY
SIBLINGS AND SUCCESSION IN THE FAMILY BUSINESS

98108

SUSAN FOURNIER, SUSAN DOBSCHA,
AND DAVID GLEN MICK

THINKING ABOUT…
PREVENTING THE PREMATURE DEATH OF RELATIONSHIP
MARKETING

J. GREGORY DEES

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE
ENTERPRISING NONPROFITS

RONALD N. ASHKENAS,
LAWRENCE J. DE MONACO,
AND SUZANNE C. FRANCIS

IDEAS AT WORK
MAKING THE DEAL REAL: HOW GE CAPITAL INTEGRATES
ACQUISITIONS

ROBERT J. CRAWFORD

BOOKS IN REVIEW
REINTERPRETING THE JAPANESE ECONOMIC MIRACLE

This document is authorized for use by weijia zhao, from 8/27/2012 to 12/4/2012, in the course: MGI 601: Workforce Management - Everest (Fall 2012), University at Buffalo (SUNY). Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited.

98106

98105

98101

98104

Behind “the softer side of Sears” is a set
of rigorous leading indicators that
measure attitudes, impressions,
and future performance.

82

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MICHELLE MCDONALD
This document is authorized for use by weijia zhao, from 8/27/2012 to 12/4/2012, in the course: MGI 601: Workforce Management - Everest (Fall 2012), University at Buffalo (SUNY). Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited.

TH E EM PLOYEE CUSTOM ERPROFIT CHAI N
AT SEARS
by Anthony J. Rucci,
Steven P. Kirn, and
Richard T. Quinn

I

t is no longer news that over the past five years, Sears, Roebuck and Company has radically changed the way it does business and dramatically improved its financial results. Much has been written about the Sears

turnaround, detailing the company’s strategic shifts and its transition from big losses to big profits. But the Sears transformation was more than a change in marketing strategy. It was also a change in the logic and culture of the business. In fact, the process of altering the logic is what changed the culture. Led (and pushed) by CEO Arthur Martinez, a group of more than 100 toplevel Sears executives spent the better part of three years rebuilding the company around its customers. In the course of rethinking what Sears was and wanted to become, these managers developed a business model of the company that tracked success from management behavior through employee attitudes to customer satisfaction and financial performance. Along with its measurement system, this employee-customer-profit model is rigorous

Copyright © 1997 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. All rights reserved. This document is authorized for use by weijia zhao, from 8/27/2012 to 12/4/2012, in the course: MGI 601: Workforce Management - Everest (Fall 2012), University at Buffalo...
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