Emotional Labour

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Q1
What is emotional labour? Defined by the author Bryman (2004) emotional labour is the state of affairs between employees as part of their working roles and the need to express feelings and emotions as part of their work. The types of emotions can be delivered in a desirable way or undesirable way, in other words positive or negative.

Why is emotional labour so important? As stated in the article written by Bryman (2004) the importance of promoting emotional labour is because, emotional labour is progressively being connected with the superiority of the service provided (Bryman, 2004). It is also highly associated with differentiation of the service provided through emotional labour. Total quality management (TQM) is also a reason why emotional labour is highly important. This is mainly because to satisfy customer needs (Bryman, 2004). Moreover, Bryman (2004) also states that there is always continuously acting in emotional labour. As distinct by Hochschild cited by Bryman (2004), there are two types of acting; surface and deep acting. This is normally associated with physical gesticulations and presenting right feelings (Bryman, 2004). Deep acting is much further challenging as compared to surface acting as deep acting is real and genuine emotions that the worker feels while surface acting is just merely acting (Bryman, 2004). Emotional labour can also have a bad influence on individuals who endorse it as said by Hochschild (1983) cited by the author Bryman (2004). Hochschild (1983) also claimed that emotional labour generates a disjuncture between in what ways workers perform and how they feel and what harms them mentally. They may work just for the sake of it and they must display feelings that he or she does not truly feel (Bryman, 2004). Moreover, as stated by the author Bryman (2004), workers become separate from their selves and accurate state of mind if they are not exhibiting genuine feelings in their work. Hence, this will result in more of surface acting. Besides that, according to the author Bryman (2004), he also states that emotional labour is much related to the influence of the organisation. Employees that work in organisations that provide services require more emotions in their work. Disney theme park employees are required to be friendly and helpful to their customers (Bryman, 2004). They are required to smile as its part of their organisational culture and they in charge for customers’ joy, by the presence of being friendly, know solutions to easy demands and also to guide customers to their endpoints (Bryman, 2004). Besides that, other service jobs such as nurtures, surgeons, midwives, airline cabin crews, shop worker, restaurants workers, hotels, call centres, zoo workers are also included in the concept of emotional labour (Bryman, 2004). Furthermore, the author Bryman (2004) has also discussed about a study of emotional labour that is power by the characteristics of the worker. The author gave an example of airline cabin crews. Airline cabin crews have a higher tendency of having female employees as they are believed to be expected to have caring skills (Bryman, 2004). This proposes that appearance and look is habitually a vital factor of the management constructions where the correct kind of a front service worker, alongside with the ability to show emotive labour is highly important (Bryman, 2004).

Q2
Emotional labour can be well-defined by ways of a strength involved in carrying out emotional instruction to fulfil with personal demands required in order to execute a job in a business (Monaghan, 2006). Having good or negative emotions has its own consequences in an organisation. First and foremost, it is vital for an organisation to have personnel’s that portray good emotional labour because this will lead to a component of the service that the organisation is providing. In other words, emotional labour...
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