Eminent Domain

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Eminent Domain
Business 186

The ancient right, for the government to take property from an individual with out consent for a common good is called Eminent Domain. Some examples of a common good are, to build a dam, an airport, a hospital or a highway. The U.S. constitution understands that right; as long as “just compensation” is paid they are permitted to take the privet property for public use.

However, New London took land from one privet party and gave the property to another privet party. By doing so the city promises to attract new growth, which in return will help invigorate the community and bring in more tax revenue. The area they want to build all these new structures is where the Undersea Warfare Center of the Navy was. When the Navy moved it took 1,400 jobs with it. The unemployment rate of the city only got worse. This has been a rough neighborhood for quite some time. Pfizer, a pharmaceutical company built a $350 million research center, which created 1,400 job opportunities. Since then the government has created parks and opened up the river fort access to the public. Furthermore, the city wants to build new homes for professionals, office buildings and a hotel.

They want space to build these luxurious homes for the professional employees of Pfizer. The houses that sit above the Thames River in front of Fort Trumbull is the area they want to use to build all these new structures. Though many people have left their houses, there are still a few that remain in their homes in this area. The city is offering a fair price for their homes but the residents do not want the money, they just want to keep their homes that they worked very hard to get.

The Supreme Court upheld the city’s condemnation right; the homeowners had to forcefully sell their homes. It ruled that required purchase to foster economic development falls under public use and is constitutionally permissible. By making this decision the Supreme Court drives the argument...
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