: Embryonic Stem Cell Research; an Ethical Issue in 21st Century Medicine

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“As people of faith we are called to be partners with God in healing and in the alleviation of Human pain and suffering,” (Presbyterian Church, United States) shows a very mixed and peaceful view of an issue that, on the contrary, sets many aflame. A distasteful blessing to most, stem cells taken from aborted fetuses in order to conduct forward-moving health research, causes ethical chaos between those of 21st century science and those of impenetrable morality. The pros of this research factually out-weigh the cons created by humanity’s biased principals, but these ethical principals endowed to society upon generations will always argue what is “truly right.”

What research has been done in the use of stem cells has shown to be very successful in health advancements. With few years of research many universities and clinics have invested in meticulous and determined work to provide the commonwealth with the following progressions in healthcare expansion: bone-marrow stem cells have been used to treat blood cancers and blood disorders, spinal cord stem cells have been used to treat ALS, and clinical trials have even begun in the use of mesenchymal stem cells to treat type 1 diabetes, healing nephritic heart tissue, and healing lung tissue in those who suffer from COPD. Scientist have also initiated “[development in] a protocol to coax human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into RPE cells,” which will recess age-related macular degeneration, and allow us sight for years longer than aging would permit the human body. The current trials and research with stem cells are growing and the list of possibilities is endless with the help of these astounding little cells. Amidst the fray of ethical altercations is the actual potential for stem cells “to do for chronic diseases what antibiotics did for infectious diseases,” (Joseph Martin, Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at Harvard University) and the belief in “the prospect of a ‘penicillin’ for Parkinson's.” (J....
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