Embers: Audience Theory and Blue Duck Hotel

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  • Topic: Audience theory, Audience, Slang
  • Pages : 4 (1429 words )
  • Download(s) : 71
  • Published : March 9, 2013
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“EMBERS”

“Embers” written by Campion Decent is a play that gives the audiences an inside into the heart- stopping tales with which communities embarked upon throughout the horrific 2003 Victorian bushfires. The inspiring stories within “Embers” give viewers the opportunity to reflect on the hardship and bravery that the characters experienced. The events that take place clearly outline the connection of which an individual had with themselves and the community. This is portrayed through the stories the Blue Duck Hotel, Danny, Don and the horses and the Mineshaft. The emotional connection is clearly shown through a range of techniques and direct quotes.

The genuine language that the characters used in the play allows the audience to connect with the emotion that they were experiencing. Jim, who was a pub owner, relates a story about the ‘Blue Duck Hotel’. His use of colloquial language in the phrases ‘chaps’, ‘we’re rooted!’ and ‘coming at ya’ gives the audience the idea of his traditional Australian character. The use of imagery/onomatopoeia in the sentence“… Everywhere you looked was bright pink. And it was getting redder and redder. And all of a sudden it just went BANG!…” allows the audience to visualize the sky the way they saw it. The use of onomatopoeia adds suspense and also gives the viewers a sense of what is was like were Jim and his friends were and the fear they would of felt. After seeing the change in colour from the skies Jim and the community would more likely want to stick together out of fear and wanting to protect one another from the fire about approach. Personification is shown when said “He handed the hose to the kangaroo and the kangaroo fought the fires. The next thing we knew the kangaroo saved the pub”. The use of personification allows the kangaroo to be seen as the hero who coincidently saved the pub. It makes the viewers more engaged on picking up the subtle commentary used; it is not possible for a kangaroo to save the pub...
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