Email vs. Snail Mail

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Email vs. Snail-Mail
Innovative technologies have always allowed duties to be completed quicker, more competently, and more professionally than ever before. Generally, every new technology is a step forward for speed and productivity. However, despite this standard, the coming of the latest mail communications revolution has brought many pros and cons with the package. Electronic mail could be the greatest thing since sliced bread, but there are features it is lacking. E-mail and conventional mail have many differences when considering the speed and application, ease and expense, and reliability of two for a person’s tasks and needs.

For instance, the speed of transfer is an important part of the decision to send mail by either method. E-mail has a distinct advantage in this category. With the click of a button, the message will be received in a period of five to thirty seconds. Whether one is sending e-mail to a person across the street or in London, the transfer rate is virtually the same. Furthermore, data files and computer applications can be sent via e-mail. Unfortunately, physical packages such as gifts or magazines cannot be attached to e-mail. On the other hand, the postal service can send any kind of physical package, from a magazine to a pool table, for a price proportional to its size. In addition, the postal service can also transfer data if it is placed on a disk or a CD-ROM. However, speed is a problem, thus origin of the term snail-mail. For example, the smallest letter can take from two days to two weeks to deliver, depending on the locations of the sender and the receiver. Even sending a letter to the house across the street takes time due to unnecessary movement. The mail is taken to the nearest large post office, sorted there, then delivered to the post office closest to the destination, and delivered from there. In other words, mail that is sent across town sometimes has to travel out of town and back again to reach the final point....
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