Ella Baker

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Ella Baker: Freedom Bound
By Joanne Grant
“Her large purse firmly tucked under her arm, her beaded hat set at a jaunty angle, Ella Baker strode forth with determination in her eye, her gait, her whole demeanor” (45; Grant). In Ella Baker: Freedom Bound, Joanne Grant discusses the political activities of Ella Baker. This book is focused on the willpower with which Miss Baker worked for civil rights throughout her lifetime. She prospered in organizing movements, protests, meetings, sit-ins; which would change the position of freedom and equality forever.

Ella Josephine Baker was born on the 13th of December 1903 in Norfolk, Virginia. She was the granddaughter of a woman who disobeyed her master when he wanted her to marry a man of his choice. Baker was a very private person; in fact, many people around her did not even know that she was married for twenty years to T. J. Roberts. She graduated from Shaw University in 1927 as the valedictorian. After her graduation, Baker moved to New York City, where she soon joined the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) as a field secretary. Later in her career as a political activist, she became the national director of the NAACP. Miss Baker never halted anywhere in her career. She sought after bringing social change to the United States of America and she wanted to do that with great speed and precision. Miss Baker’s work is difficult to capture on paper. She was involved with all kinds of associations that were initiated through the desire to have equal rights and end segregation. She was unstoppable and worked like a machine to eliminate the flaws of the society. In 1957, she became one of the organizers of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. (SCLC) She was the first director of this organization. The main goal of the SCLC was to gain equal rights for all Americans. This organization was based on not only non-violence philosophies of Martin Luther King, but...
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