Ell Families and Schools-Lre

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Over the last century educators throughout America have asserted that speaking two languages put children at a disadvantage for successfully integrating into life in the USA. Recent research tells us that this is not so, and that culturally responsive teaching may enhance the educational outcome (Gollnick and Chin, 2005). Five pieces of information most valuable to my future teaching are: 1.Know the specific family

In contrast to much of the mainsteam of America, as ESL professionals, teachers are trained to promote acculturation, not assimilation. Although teachers advocate for ESL students and their parents' "cultural" rights, teachers, of course, also want them to be able to function in the mainstream. It will be important for me as a teacher to help my parents of English language learners to fit into American society and it will be important for me to integrate the student's culture into the class (Banks, J. and Banks, C., 2003). This starts with me the teacher being familiar with the specific family to work effectively with those ELL parents. When considering the involvement of ESL parents, it is important to make it easy for parents to be involved in their child's education. Teachers should survey parents about family to learn about the best way to work with the family and connect with community resources to help with understnding the family's needs and interests. It will be important for me to ensure that my professional development promotes personal cultural competence.

An essential part of my role as an advocate will be to identify appropriate placement for students. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires that all children with identified disabilities receive a free and appropriate placement (FAPE) and be educated in the most appropriate, but least restrictive environment (LRE). The...
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